Coventry Hearsall Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Coventry Hearsall Golf Club

About Coventry Hearsall Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Coventry Hearsall Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Coventry Hearsall Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Coventry Hearsall Golf Club

Set in the heart of the City of Coventry, Coventry Hearsall Golf Club offers a fine friendly setting for a round of golf. Founded in 1894 and improved constantly the course offers a refreshing challenge to all abilities of golfer. The clubhouse has recently been refurbished to a high standard and offers meals and drinks in our comfortable bar and lounge areas. Locker and changing facilities have also been refurbished to an excellent standard with all the amenities you would expect to find these days.

Coventry Hearsall Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Green Speed Can Be Seen

Unfortunately you don’t see many signs at golf courses that read “Warning: Green Speed 12. Putts Will Be Very Fast and Break Excessively. ” But a trained eye can detect and evaluate green speeds within a very small tolerance. If you don ‘t believe me ask any golf course superintendent or PGA Tour pro. Both make their living knowing how fast their greens roll. How do they know? The superintendent regularly takes measurements with a Stimpmeter and the pros talk to the superintendents then correlate what they’re told with their experience of watching their putts roll.

But don’t think you can ask your superintendent the green speed at your course and automatically be an expert. Appearances can be deceiving. Fast greens usually look brownish with short grass and firm surfaces. Most slow greens have long dark green grass and tend to be softer (Figure 8.3.2). Also the thicker the grass even when cut short the slower and greener it looks. So you always should roll a few putts at any new course to check the green speed because a green that looks slow can be “sneaky fast ” and vice versa.

Grain (see section 7.10 for details) also affects a green’s speed. Because Stimpmeter ratings are taken in more than one direction grain is averaged into the green-speed reading. But grain still can have a dramatic effect on how putts roll and break. I’ve measured grain’s effect on numerous occasions: On a 40-foot putt putting against the grain can mean a difference of 10 feet versus the same putt rolled with the grain (Figure 8.3.3). So you must learn to recognize green speed in the direction you are putting.

Speed Is More Important Than Line 187

Up until now I’ve talked a great deal about visible break true break Aimlines and peen speeds. Those have all been terms referring to the conditions found on the green you’re playing. Now that you understand those concepts I want to give you another one that applies to all putts and does not change from green to green.

Coventry Hearsall Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Stimpmeter is a solid straight piece of aluminum extruded at a 30-degree angle with an indentation near the top and a beveled bottom (Figure 4.3.2). The beveled bottom allows the Stimpmeter to sit low to the green surface and reduce the bounce of a ball rolling down the channel when it hits the green.

The Stimpmeter was designed to release balls onto a green surface with constant initial speed (energy).

Measuring Green Speed To use a Stimpmeter a ball is placed in the indentation and the device is raised slowly until the ball rolls free and down the groove onto the green (Figure 4.3.3). Care must he taken to hold the Stimpmeter still as the ball rolls down the ramp to ensure constant release energy and ball speed at the bottom of the ramp.

To measure green speed three balls are rolled in one direction on the green measuring how far each ball rolls (in feet) from the end of the Stimpmeter. The same three balls then are rolled in the opposite direction over the same section of the green and again the distances are measured. The six distances are averaged to produce a quantitative measurement of the average distance a ball rolls on that green called the green speed. A slow green is about a 7 (meaning the balls rolled an average of 7 feet) while a fast green comes in at about a 10. Most PGA tournaments aim for green speeds between 10.5 and 11. When greens start rolling at 12 to 13 they are called “Augusta fast ” because that’s often the speed of the greens at Augusta National Golf Club home of The Masters every spring.

Longer rolls (from higher green speeds) for longer times mean the friction of

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 63 the green surface is low letting balls roll farther and longer. A rapidly slowing and short roll off a Stimpmeter means the friction of the green surface is high and the green speed is very slow.

Green speed always affects a putt’s speed and direction of roll (except on dead flat greens where direction is straight no matter what the speed). And the combination of green speed the amount of energy transferred to a putt and the influence of contours and slopes on the greens determines the results of your putts based on how much the putt truly breaks your putt’s initial Aimline and starting speed.

Coventry Hearsall Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Coventry Hearsall Golf Club

Please start with the three pictures below. Understand that the point of these pictures is to get your arms and chest connected. You should understand the feeling of “being connected” before you try to incorporate this critical step into your golf swing. If you hold the club straight out in front of you, there will be a triangle formed between your arms and chest. Just focus on keeping the triangle between your arms and chest fixed. Just move your arms with your chest. When your chest stops rotating, your arms also stop. Please see the three pictures below and try it out. Turn to your right, then back around to your left, keeping the triangle between your arms and chest constant at all times.

Coventry Hearsall Golf Club