Cotswold Edge Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Cotswold Edge Golf Club

About Cotswold Edge Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Cotswold Edge Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Cotswold Edge Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Cotswold Edge Golf Club

Cotswold Edge Golf Club is one of the most picturesque golf courses in the South West of England.Playable the whole year round, the challenging par 71 course enjoys stunning views from the top of the Cotswold Escapement, overlooking the historic market town of Wotton-under-Edge and Gloucestershire’s Severn Vale, to the Brecon Beacons and the Malvern Hills beyond.Measuring just over 6,000 yards in total, the front nine is a traditional parkland layout, while the back nine, although shorter, is a good test of every golfer’s iron play.Visitors are welcome, although it is recommended you call the Pro Shop in advance to check availability and while no handicap certificate is required, players must wear recognised golf apparel.

Cotswold Edge Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

You Can’t Avoid Adrenaline Everybody gets to experience excitement and adrenaline in golf. It’s part of why we love the game and if you want to become a better player you must learn to deal with it. You must learn to play well when adrenaline is in your system. This is easy in the power game when you want to hit the ball as far you can with whatever club is in your hands. Adrenaline in your system helps you to do this. But putting is altogether different. You can’t take one less club on the green when you’re pumped up. And you certainly don ‘t want to putt the ball as far as you can.

Luckily there is a simple way to control adrenaline when putting. Learn to putt

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 69 in such a way that the adrenaline-affected muscles of your fingers hands and wrists don’t control how far or fast your putts roll. You’ll learn about that in section 13.5.

Forearm Rotation

Just about every shot in golf except putting requires rotation of the forearms through the impact zone. But apply that same rotation to your putting stroke and you’ll produce double trouble. First your putterface will rotate from open to closed so the likelihood that it is square at the moment of impact becomes very small. Second forearm rotation supplies unwanted and unnecessary power and usually a lot of it.

But there’s yet another problem with forearm rotation: it feels natural. Even Tour professionals don’t realize they’re doing it and when I tell them to stop they usually say “What do you mean I’m not rotating my arms! ” But of course they are. And like the pros most golfers don’ t mean to do it and if you ask them don’t think they are. But they are and you probably are too. Which is too bad because forearm rotation makes putting more difficult more inconsistent and less effective.

Cotswold Edge Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

So if you can’t practice with pressure how do you make practice help your putting on the golf course when it really counts? You could try to avoid pressure on the course but that’s not going to happen. The only way to putt well under pressure is to develop a stroke in practice that works both in practice and on the course when the pressure is on and your muscles are strong. I ‘m not saying you should develop a “pressure stroke ” one that’s different from the stroke you normally practice and use. What I am saying is that you should be smart enough to use your practice time to develop a normal stroke that is the same as your pressure stroke. This is a stroke that doesn’t depend on the strength of your muscles or the speed of your heartbeat. It is a stroke that will work just as well under pressure as in practice. As you’ll see below it’s called a dead-hands stroke.

The Hit Stroke

Let me explain what this “dead-hands” stroke is not. It is not your natural stroke because most golfers’ natural instinct is to “hit” a putt with the muscles of the fingers hands and wrists. Our instincts are developed in our childhood when we play games that involve hitting things turning knobs and manipulating pushing and controlling the objects in our lives with our fingers hands and wrists. This also is the way most people putt because they consider it to be natural. But just because it’s natural does not make it either the right way or the best way.

But golfers hit their putts (Figure 5.3.1). And when a ball is hit the distance it rolls depends on how hard it is hit. The power of the putt depends on the energy or effort put into the stroke. And therein lies the problem: You can’t see or feel the power of a hit before it happens. No matter how much a golfer practices hitting putts the right distance and speed when he or she gets under pressure and tries to apply the same hit to the ball with adrenaline-filled muscles the results will be wrong. Once again as the muscles get stronger the same feel that produced good results in practice produces a more powerful hit under pressure.

Many low-handicap amateurs fall into this trap. They practice with the belief that the harder and longer they work the better they’ll putt under pressure. They believe that putting well under pressure involves courage strength of conviction or some other inner quality of the heart. I suppose these character traits are admirable but they have nothing to do with how far the ball rolls in good putting. If you insist on hitting your putts and controlling your putt distance with your muscles then the only way to practice feel and touch is under pressure. The good player can accomplish this by playing in tournaments in which he is likely to face many pressure putts. Do enough of that – and enough is a lot – and you begin preparing yourself for future pressure situations. Higher-handicap golfers have a slightly different problem. Because hitting

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 117 with the hands is the natural way to putt most golfers begin by doing just that. The results won’t be very good but because the golfer is still new to the game poor putting will seem acceptable. It’s later as these golfers improve their ball-striking and short games and work on bringing their handicaps down that their natural (hand-muscle-controlled) putting stroke limits their ability to score.

The Amateurs Proved It

Cotswold Edge Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Cotswold Edge Golf Club

The wrists have completed their roll, and the left elbow is close the body.Swinging around the spine. The wrists have completed the roll and now the forearms are crossing. The follow through is almost complete. If you notice, the triangle is still in place, proving that you are connected throughout the entire swing.

Cotswold Edge Golf Club