Copthorne Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Copthorne Golf Club

About Copthorne Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Copthorne Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Copthorne Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Copthorne Golf Club

Copthorne, a lovely old course set in attractive woodland, has been a private members club ever since its founding in 1892.Situated half way between East Grinstead and Crawley and only five minutes from Junction 10 on the M23, the Club is very accessible but also offers a haven away from the hustle and bustle of life in the area. The quiet atmosphere is created by the trees, many of them hundreds of years old, which absorb the noise of the world about them.The Clubhouse, which overlooks the 18th green, offers friendly and up to date accommodation both for golf and social events. In 2001, a major development was completed to upgrade the locker rooms and build a new Professional’s shop integral with the main building.

Copthorne Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

5.4 The Dead-Hands Stroke

The alternative to “hitting”your putts is to”stroke” them. And the ultimate stroke is a pendulum stroke which requires “dead hands” to make it a pure pendulum. A pure pendulum stroke is the weakest least powerful swing in golf. When you first try it you will probably feel insecure as if you can’t get the ball to the hole so you’ll probably leave every putt short. You also will feel as if you don’t have control of the ball. Of course no golfer truly ever has total control of the ball: You can only start a putt on the proper line at the proper speed. Thinking you can do anything else classifies you as a dreamer.

So not being able to control the putt is not a negative; rather it is a truth of the game. Trying to control your putts with a hitting action may make you feel good in the short run but ultimately it degrades your putting. On the other hand not trying to control your putting – using a dead-hands stroke – is a positive action because it is pressure-proof. No matter how strong the muscles of your fingers hands and wrist become due to adrenaline if you don’t use them they won’t hurt your putting feel or touch. If you let the length of your swing starting with the length of your backswing determine the length of the roll of your putts and you perform your stroke in

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 119 your personal body rhythm (more on this in section 6.5) then you can learn excellent putting touch and control of your putts’ speed and distance. Look at the putting stroke of Senior Tour player George Archer (Figure 5.4.1). George not only produces a nearly perfect pendulum stroke – as you can see in the consistency of the arm-to-wrists angle in three positions of the stroke (backswing impact and end of follow-through) – but he also uses a pendulum rhythm. George’s pure-in-line-square putting stroke is one of the best you’ll ever see.

The major advantage of the dead-hands stroke is the elimination of the hand and wrist muscles which leads to the subsequent absence of any adrenaline effects. But there are two more reasons to recommend it. Because it is the weakest swing in golf it requires much longer strokes for longer putts than the hit stroke. That means it will be easier to learn to control the length of the roll by the length of the stroke. And since the wrist muscles aren’t used for power they become more sensitive to the feel (kinesthetics) of the stroke.

A Dead-Hands Advantage

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The skill bases for your touch and feel (green-reading will be discussed in Chapter 7) are intermingled in your mind. They are also intermingled in that they have a combined effect on putting results. But each is a separate skill which can be learned and developed over time.

Touch is in your head but it begins with knowing what your putt looks like and remembering (knowing based on past experience) how much power (the size or intensity of stroke) was required in the past for similar putts. Touch is an acquired skill based on past experiences. It resides in your memory bank and plays a part in creating the mind’s-eye picture of the size of stroke you need.

Before you can develop a good feel for a putt you need to have a good idea for how long it is and how much power will be required to roll it the proper speed and distance: In other words you need to have touch. Given that feel for the putt involves having a good idea of how to apply the power which will be needed to roll the ball at the optimum speed along that line to allow it to break into the hole. Having good feel for a putt is having the idea or picture in your mind’s eye of how the stroke will look and feel in both rhythm and intensity as it rolls the ball to the hole. So a part of feel is in your head. Feel also involves a kinesthetic awareness for the violence (or nonviolence) of your swing and knowing the physical sensation to expect at impact including the vibrations that will travel up the shaft after the putter strikes the ball. It is based on the feel of your collected experience from thousands of swings you’ve made on previous putts and the results they produced. This feel is produced in your nerve endings fingers arms and shoulders in the muscles of all of these entities as well as in your brain and memory.

Is one part of feel more important than any other? I don’t know. But more to the point I’m not sure I care. Because I do know that all these factors are necessary for good putting and the end result feel ultimately is experiential. You’ve got to do it lots of times to learn it and know it.

Feel is knowing how to do it touch is knowing what to do. A golfer with good touch can have a had day physically when his body simply can ‘t execute what his brain knows he should do. On a day like this we’d say his feel is off. This golfer will be frustrated because he doesn’t seem to be able to do what he knows he can and needs to do. Compare that to a golfer with poor touch: He can have great feel and still never make a putt because if you choose the wrong speed yet roll it perfectly at that speed the results still won ‘t be very good. So poor-touch golfers are more likely to get bewildered than frustrated (Figure 5.2.1).

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 115

5.3 Realities of Touch and Feel

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Copthorne Golf Club

Here is a picture at full speed. The wrists have completed their roll through the ball. The left elbow is close to the body, and about ready to break, allowing for follow through.Now, I’ll take you into the follow-through. This will be simple. Basically just keep turning around your spine. If you have flipped your wrists correctly, you won’t have to bother too much with the follow through. However, there is a basic position that you should be in when you finish the swing. You should be facing the target, and your right and left forearms should be crossed. Your right forearm should be closest to you, and the club should be out towards left field.

Copthorne Golf Club