Consett District Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Consett & District Golf Club

About Consett & District Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Consett & District Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Consett & District Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Consett & District Golf Club

If you are planning an away day, we sincerely hope you will consider visiting our beautiful established course set in the Derwent Valley. You will be made most welcome. It is an excellent course for an enjoyable day for golf societies, as well as corporate golf days and casual visitors.Green fees are £25 per day, Monday to Friday, and £30 on a weekend. When playing with a member the fees are £15 per day, Monday to Friday, and £20 on a weekend.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

I immediately measured and learned that the visible break of most putts is only about a third of the true break. A third! I finally understood why my students couldn’t see the true break even when I was beating on them to look for it. It’s hard to sec something that never appears before you (the true-break Aimline) especially when something that looks so real (your ball rolling on the visible-break ball track) is right in front of you. So the eyesight of the 1 500 golfers I tested was not so bad after all. The amateurs had seen most of the visible break and the Tour pros had seen all of it. The problem was they thought the visible-break apex was where they had aimed and stroked their putts. They were totally unaware of their subconscious compensations to pull or push their starting lines up near the true-break Aimline in order to get their putts to roll there!

7.8 Gut-Feel Putting

You now should understand why most golfers under-read break. The only break they ever sec is the visible break and they assume the visible-break apex is the line they started their putt on. They never realize that their subconscious is fight ing compensating to get their putts high enough to have a chance to find the hole

(although it doesn’t quite make it all the way so 90 percent of their misses are below the hole).

When I ask golfers how they read the break of their putts what they are looking at or how they do this they often can’t answer. Those who do sometimes say they pick the spot they want the ball to roll over then aim at it. Many of them tell me they just feel the break in their “gut ” and putt “out there” somewhere. If you think about these answers and compare them to the situation detailed above you can understand why golfers miss most of their putts below the hole: Your putt needs to start on a line aimed at the true-break point to roll over the visual-break apex; but you don’t have a chance of rolling over the visual-break apex if you start your putt rolling at it because gravity will pull it down the hill every time.

If you just”trust it “”go with your instinct “”go with your gut “”trust your first read ” or “listen to your caddy ” you are a “gut-feel” putter. You’re probably trying to aim at the visible-break apex thinking it’s the true break and probably missing about 90 percent of your breaking putts below the hole. Most golfers are “gut-feel” putters. It’s the easiest way to putt because it ‘s comfortable (it’s the way you first learned) and your subconscious keeps you from being embarrassed. Unfortunately it’s not the best way to make putts. But that’s the way it’s been for over 400 years and it’s likely to continue that way for another 400 if you don’t start playing more break.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

So does any golfer want to move the putter or aim the putterface in any direction other than the desired starting line of the putt at the moment of impact? Of course not! Yet some golfers think they can achieve the perfect path through impact by using a screen-door stroke which rotates around their bodies. They obviously don’t realize that the timing of impact (and ball position) must be perfect every time if they hope to have a chance of holing any putts. And they don’t realize that the in-line-square stroke motion minimizes the effects of inconsistencies in timing and ball position.

One Negative

I’m not trying to sell you an in-line putting stroke. If this pils stroke seems too si mple and you want to make putting more difficult that’s okay by me. I’m just trying to inform you that a pure-in-line stroke is the easiest and best way to putt. But it’s not a panacea and there is one potential drawback to putting with this stroke (it’s the same drawback as for the screen-door stroke too).

To see this drawback look at how Perfy misses a simple three-foot putt with

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 85 his perfect in-line-square stroke (Figure 4.7.9). The problem is obvious: If you don’t align your shoulders parallel to the desired starting line for the putt even the perfect stroke path and a square putter blade won’t start the ball rolling on the right line.

So if you are going to take my advice and develop an in-line-square stroke you must be absolutely sure that as you learn this stroke you also learn to address the ball with your shoulders square (parallel-left) to your putting line. And as you will learn in Chapter 11 setting up parallel-left has other benefits as well.

4.8 The Importance of Putterface Angle

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Consett & District Golf Club

At this point the right wrist is completely on top of the left wrist. Your hands are “through the ball”. You have continued to rotate around your spine, and you have tried to stop the left elbow on the imaginary line. This is the primary action for amateur golfer to increase power, while reducing slice.

Consett & District Golf Club