Comrie Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Comrie Golf Club

About Comrie Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Comrie Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Comrie Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Comrie Golf Club

Comrie Golf Club was founded in 1891 and is notably one of the finest and picturesque nine hole golf courses in Perthshire. Situated on the outskirts of the village of Comrie, seven miles from Crieff on the A85 is just under a half an hours drive from Gleneagles, venue for the 2014 Ryder Cup and one and a half hours drive from Edinburgh and Glasgow airports. The greens are always in excellent condition, and the club is proud of the quality of the course. Golfers of all abilities will find it a challenging experience to play.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

I believe the best putters in the world are playing on the PGA Tour. My proof is the results of the first two World Putting Championships where the Tour pros were seriously challenged by some Senior Tour players several LPGA Tour players and a number of amateurs both young and old. However the PGA Tour players placed higher as a group than any other.

Also my data on the percentage of putts holed from different distances shows that the PGA Tour players lead all other groups. Don’t think that you can look at the statistics quoted in the newspapers and find this information because the number that the papers publish (provided by the Tour) simply show how many putts the players average on greens hit in regulation which is affected by the quality of their iron shots (the better the iron play the shorter their putts). And these are the new putting stats. Years ago the Tour’s statistics measured putts taken per green which was influenced by how many greens players missed and how consistently they chipped close to the hole (again leaving them shorter putts). Neither of these statistics measures the quality of a player’s putting because both are strongly influenced by the quality of different shots (approaches and chips).

The true measure of the Tour pros’ putting is indicated by the percentage of putts they make (“convert”) based solely on the length of the putts (shown in Figure 1.4.1 page 7). The shaded curve is data on PGA Tour players taken between the years 1977 and 1992 and shows the spread between the best and worst conversion percentages. It has now been almost 10 years since we measured how well the pros putt and the Pelz Golf Institute is in the process of repeating this test. We hope we’ll find that the percentages have changed in recent years (they remained fairly consistent in the period from ’87 to ’92) as the conditions of greens improve and as players improve their skills (and perhaps as some of our teaching is taking effect).

If you want an answer to question 2 – “How well do you putt?” – you must measure your percentage of putts holed from each distance. You can do this but it will take some effort. You have to record the distance of each putt on your scorecard as you move around the course and indicate those you hole. After 10 to 15

Problems on the Greens 29 rounds (and at least 5 to 10 putts from each distance) you’ll begin to be able to plot your own conversion chart and compare it to those of the pros.

As for question 3 – “How good can one get at putting?” – the answer depends on a number of things: the quality of the greens how well a player reads those greens and the quality of the player’s stroke and touch. Although none of these questions can be answered definitively in this book I assure you that all of the above are getting better all the time. As greens improve putting strokes improve and golfers learn to read greens better a higher percentage of putts from every distance will be made in the future.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 93 within about the first 20 percent of their roll. Despite this golfers think that Ben Crenshaw became a good putter by learning to put overspin on his putts and that Bobby Locke put “hook spin” on his putts which made them dive into the hole. Neither of these descriptions is true but amateur golfers believe them because they sound reasonable and give them something new to try in their own putting. (They also give amateurs an excuse for not putting better. Trust me: Most amateurs don’t need any more excuses.)

Still many golfers and even some teaching professionals extol the benefits of “releasing” the putter through impact rotating the face from open to closed to impart hook spin or overspin. Again all reasonably well-stroked putts can be shown to be rolling without any spin whatsoever when they reach the hole. So trying to release the putter makes no sense unless it encourages you to follow through in your stroke and eliminates deceleration and instability. However even in this case releasing the putter will produce more face rotation and give you more inconsistency in directional control due to increased timing problems.

The Razor-Blade Putter

Because so many people assume that putts can spin all the way to the hole and are obsessed with the idea of overspin I built a putter that let me examine and evaluate the benefit of true overspin. I embedded a razor blade just above the center of a putterface (Figure 4.9.4) making sure the sharp edge of the blade would contact the ball above its geometric center and impart true overspin.

I tested the razor-blade putter versus an identical putter with a normal face and counted how many putts each one holed. On very short putts – inside three feet – the razor putter performed pretty well. However on longer putts it created true initial overspin that caused the balls to “grab” on the green and jump forward uncontrollably.

But there was more. If the grass was damp or I was putting against the grain the overspin didn’t take and the ball didn’t travel as far; when the grass was dry or when putting with the grain the spinning ball grabbed and jumped forward to roll widely divergent distances. So overspin if you could create it causes inconsistency. Which is why I say “Forget about it!”

Physical and Mental Factors

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Comrie Golf Club

The wrists have completed their roll, and the left elbow is close the body.Swinging around the spine. The wrists have completed the roll and now the forearms are crossing. The follow through is almost complete. If you notice, the triangle is still in place, proving that you are connected throughout the entire swing.

Comrie Golf Club