College Pines Golf Club

Golf Lessons at College Pines Golf Club

About College Pines Golf Club

Golf Lessons at College Pines Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit College Pines Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

College Pines Golf Club

A well established, 18 hole heathland course set amongst the idyllic surroundings of Clumber Park and Worksop College. Designed, built and professionally operated by David Snell and his family, College Pines Golf Club welcomes players of all abilities and provides everything for the enthusiastic golfer. With a friendly atmosphere, good facilities and full greens and tees in use every day we are truly “the home of all year round golf”

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

This mis-hit phenomenon goes in the opposite direction for left-to-right putts for lefties as shown in Figure 14.6.2:

1. For a mis-hit on the toe (uphill side of the putter) the two effects of the mis-hit go in opposite directions and tend to cancel each other out. The putt stars

Face Your Special Problems 355 uphill too high but then breaks too much because it is rolling more slowly than planned and will still find the hole (as shown on the left).

Make sure you understand what I’m saying here. Most golfers address these tough little putts normally then hit some solid some off the heel and some off the toe always missing the ones they hit on the downhill side of the sweetspot. My advice is to cheat by an eighth of an inch toward the uphill side of the sweetspot at address then make your normal stroke trying to hit it there. If you do you’re fine; if you mis-hit slightly in either direction you’re still fine because a small miss farther toward the uphill side of the putterface will still go in (you missed the sweetspot by perhaps a quarter-inch which you can get away with on short pulls). If your stroke missed in the downhill direction you cheated away from it so you’ll actually hit the sweetspot and the putt will go into the center of the hole. Accomplish cheating by first addressing your putt normally then move slightly closer to your ball when you want to cheat toward the heel slightly farther away when you want to cheat toward the toe. And when I say move “slightly ” I mean only an

356 Face Your Special Problems eighth of an inch. (This is important. Don’t overdo this as the energy transferred to your putt will start to drop off drastically if you move too far causing impact too far away from the sweetspot.) Figure 14.6.3 shows how much I recommend to cheat in your address position of putterface to ball.

Please note: I wrote this section for lefties to make sure you right-handers were paying attention. If you are right-handed or putt right-handed reverse the heel and toe references in Figures 14.6.1 and 14.6.2 above (if this bothers you it may help you appreciate more what left-handed golfers face their entire lives constantly being told to “reverse for left-handers”).

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Three Pendulums

In my first book on putting Putt Like the Pros which was published about 10 years ago I pointed out that a pure-in-line stroke path along the Aimline was the easiest most natural and best putter path to use (Figure 4.6.4). However it turns out that many golfers including some golf professionals never read or understood the concepts that determined this to be a natural motion and continue to believe and teach that the putter should swing around the body in the screen-door semicircular motion as shown in Figure 4.6.5. To understand why the in-line stroke motion is the simplest way to putt you must first understand the mechanics of the way pendulums swing. Three pendu

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 75 lums are illustrated in Figure 4.6.6. Each is swinging from a fixed point with pendulum A swinging vertically below its suspension point describing a back-andforth in-line path along a straight line. Pendulum B is swinging at a 20-degree angle to the vertical supported by a small force shown by arrow B and describing a curved path around the spot directly below its suspension point. Pendulum C is swinging at the opposite 20-degree angle supported by arrow C in a curved motion in the opposite direction around the spot below its suspension point.

All three pendulums are describing pure pendulum motions (the pendulum rhythm will be discussed in section 6.3) which occur in a gravitational field such as that found on Earth. But only pendulum A swings with gravity helping to determine its straight in-line path without any rotation or curvature of the swing path. As you can see both pendulums B and C require outside forces to keep them moving in circular motions.

Now relate these pendulums to putting strokes by attaching putters to the bottom of each pendulum. Pendulum B is what Harvey Penick prescribed: The golfer’s hands hang outside of his shoulder line (the suspension point) at some angle supported by the force B (shown by Justin Leonard in Figure 4.6.7). This puller will describe a curved path around the body like a screen door as long as no hand or arm muscles prevent it from doing so.

In Figure 4.6.8 Fuzzy Zoeller simulates pendulum C by holding his hands inside of his shoulders and at an angle to his suspension point. This putter clearly rotates from outside the Aimline going back to outside the Aimline on the follow-through (the opposite of the screen-door rotation of pendulum B). Again this is a natural pendulum motion but it requires a small force (C) to keep his hands and his I5-degree angle to the vertical below the suspension point.

In these two examples of pendulums B and C it is clear that small side forces are required to make these strokes acceptable for putting and both strokes involve curved paths rotating around the golfer’s body. Now look at pendulum A as a putting stroke which involves no side force or curving path.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

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At the end of step two, you reached the top of your backswing. As soon, as you get there, start your downswing. As you start the downswing, make sure to remind yourself to keep your arms “connected” to your chest and shoulders. Stay connected all the way through the ball. Your hands and arms only swing as the shoulders rotate. If you start your downswing by rotating your chest, without starting to swing your arms, you will most definitely end up slicing the ball. If you swing your arms before rotating your chest, you will most likely hook the ball. Staying connected will always produce the straightest ball.

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