Cochrane Castle Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Cochrane Castle Golf Club

About Cochrane Castle Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Cochrane Castle Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Cochrane Castle Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Cochrane Castle Golf Club

This challenging course overlooking the Clyde Valley is situated on the outskirts of Johnstone, seven miles southwest of Glasgow Airport and is readily accessible from the Johnstone By-Pass (A737).Although access is through the Cochrane Castle Housing Estate, the course itself is well screened with trees and the visitor is assured of enjoyable golf in well-managed surroundings.The Club has been awarded the Scottish Golf Course Wildlife Charter in recognition of its efforts in promoting good environmental practice.

Cochrane Castle Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

What about grain the direction the grass grows (Figure 2.3.1)? The stronger the grass blades and the stronger the forces of nature (such as nearby water sun angle and wind all of which cause grass to grow in certain directions) the greater the likelihood that the grain will influence your putting. Again grain can be accurately measured and known but not in the time a golfer has while sizing up his next putt. (For a more detailed look at grain see section 7.10.)

Here’s one few golfers consider: the ball’s balance. Most golfers assume that all golf balls are perfectly balanced but I assure you they are not. In many balls the center of gravity (CG) or mass (the center of weight distribution) is not exactly at its geometric center. To understand this imagine a golf ball as shown in Figure 2.3.2 which is perfectly balanced except for a small mass of lead positioned horizontally from its center. Such an imbalance could he caused by a bad operation in the construction of (or mud on) a ball. Imagine if such a ball was rolled perfectly side by side with a perfectly balanced ball on a perfect green. Due to the imbalance of weight rather than rolling in the desired direction (Figure 2.3.3 right) the ball would roll off to the side (Figure 2.3.3 left) and miss the hole. Worse than the lost stroke the golfer probably would think he had just blown a short putt that he should have made leading him to change his stroke to fix a problem that didn’t exist. The problem which the golfer never knew of or even suspected was the ball (see sections 9.8 and 9.9).

Getting a little scared? Don’t be. True putting can appear to be very complex. And things at times will get still worse believe me. But believe this too: It’s no problem. Because in the end once you learn to not be bothered by all these “nitnoy” problems the more good strokes you make and the better you read the greens the more of your putts that will find the hole.

Problems on the Greens 19

Years ago as I began pondering the inconsistencies and uncertainties in putting performance I became fascinated by the possibility of learning enough about putting to help golfers learn to do it better. I had a breakthrough – a moment when I knew I’d truly be able to help people – when I started studying the footprints golfers left on greens. As I watched a ball I’d filmed in slow motion roll innumerable directions on a single putt it seemed as though an army had marched across the green on the line of the putt. I examined that area of the green at sunset. I sat in amazement watching the shadows lengthen wondering how anyone could hole any putt over such an uneven surface. There seemed to be thousands of footprint lines humps humps and heel-print edges in the grass any one of which was capable of turning a slowly rolling ball in a different direction. I realized that even a perfectly stroked putt rolling over that green would have a very good chance of being diverted from the hole. I also realized that an imperfectly stroked putt rolling over that same green would have a chance of being knocked into the hole.

That was one of what I consider the critical “learning moments” I’ve had in golf. Looking closely at that green from ground level I decided to measure the severity of this effect on the entire course. I got up early the next morning and followed the first group while the greens were still covered with dew. This allowed me to actually see and count the individual footprints. I learned that a foursome often makes more than 500 footprints on each green it plays. Even worse these footprints were not evenly distributed: Most were within six feet of the hole because half of all putts were from less than six feet away. They created a trampled-down area between 6 feet and 6 inches away from the hole (no one was so inconsiderate as to step within 6 inches of the cup) and 360 degrees around it. I began referring to this area as the “lumpy donut” (see Figure 2.4.1).

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 61

But if you want to learn more about controlling your putting speed and making more putts you need to know more about speed than that. In fact you need to know how the rolling speed of your putts compares to their perfect or optimum speed around the hole. The speed of a putt depends on its length how fast it started where it is along its ball track how fast the green surface is and the slope (up down or sidehill) it is rolling on. For every putt there is an optimum speed that will optimize the percentage of putts that would both hit and stay in the hole. Therefore in this book as in my Scoring Game Schools we refer to a putt’s speed (while imagining its ball track) as how it relates to the optimum speed it should or could be rolling. For example as you can see in Figure 4.3.1 the left putt’s speed was too much as compared to the right putt’s speed which was virtually perfect. A detailed discussion of putting speed and optimum-speed ball tracks is in Chapter 7.

Green Speed

The speed of the surface of the green or green speed affects a ball’s roll in speed direction and amount of break. I ‘m sure you have heard greens referred to as “fast ” “slow ” “quick ” “slick ” or “sticky.” Technically the speed of the green is determined by the frictional characteristics of the surface of the green which is controlled primarily by the length type density and moisture content of the grass (more on this in Chapter 7). Golf course superintendents traditionally measure the speed characteristics of greens using a device called the Stimpmeter. much speed (left) and perfect speed (right) for two putts rolled on the same starting line.

The Stimpmeter developed years ago by a man named Edward Stimpson is a crude yet simple way to measure how far a ball will roll on a flat portion of a green when it is given a standard starting speed. The USGA-approved version of a

Stimpmeter is a solid straight piece of aluminum extruded at a 30-degree angle with an indentation near the top and a beveled bottom (Figure 4.3.2). The beveled bottom allows the Stimpmeter to sit low to the green surface and reduce the bounce of a ball rolling down the channel when it hits the green.

The Stimpmeter was designed to release balls onto a green surface with constant initial speed (energy).

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Cochrane Castle Golf Club

Here is a picture at full speed. The wrists have completed their roll through the ball. The left elbow is close to the body, and about ready to break, allowing for follow through.Now, I’ll take you into the follow-through. This will be simple. Basically just keep turning around your spine. If you have flipped your wrists correctly, you won’t have to bother too much with the follow through. However, there is a basic position that you should be in when you finish the swing. You should be facing the target, and your right and left forearms should be crossed. Your right forearm should be closest to you, and the club should be out towards left field.

Cochrane Castle Golf Club