Cleobury Mortimer Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Cleobury Mortimer Golf Club

About Cleobury Mortimer Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Cleobury Mortimer Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Cleobury Mortimer Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Cleobury Mortimer Golf Club

Founded by Robert and Graham Pain in July 1993, Cleobury Mortimer Golf Club has rapidly become one of the most popular golf courses in the Midlands. Although run as a members club with competitions and matches held all year round for our 600 members, visitors and guests are made most welcome at all times.

Cleobury Mortimer Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 85 his perfect in-line-square stroke (Figure 4.7.9). The problem is obvious: If you don’t align your shoulders parallel to the desired starting line for the putt even the perfect stroke path and a square putter blade won’t start the ball rolling on the right line.

So if you are going to take my advice and develop an in-line-square stroke you must be absolutely sure that as you learn this stroke you also learn to address the ball with your shoulders square (parallel-left) to your putting line. And as you will learn in Chapter 11 setting up parallel-left has other benefits as well.

4.8 The Importance of Putterface Angle

While putter path has relatively minor influence on the starting line direction of your putts (only about 17 percent) the putterface angle at the moment of impact (Figure 4.8.1) has a tremendous effect the remaining 83 percent (assuming contact is made on the sweetspot). This means face angle is more than four times as important as putter path. You may find this imbalance in importance surprising (most golfers do) but it’s true.

If you are having a hard time believing this run the following test for yourself. As shown in Figure 4.8.2 aim the edge of a heavy piece of wood to the left edge of a target. Place a ball just outside the wood about the distance from the heel of the

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 87 putter to the sweetspot and hold the putterface open to a 45-degree angle to the target with a piece of cardboard (cut the cardboard with equal-length sides A and B at right angles then cut side C between the end points as shown in the inset). Using both hands to hold the face open at that angle and keeping the heel against the wood slide the putter toward the target to simulate a putting stroke (shown from right to left in figure). If you keep the face 45 degrees open the ball will start to the right almost perpendicular to the open face (actually 45 degrees times .83 = 37 degrees) no matter how hard you hit it.

Cleobury Mortimer Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

What happens when you practice putting? The heart doesn ‘t beat faster you are not excited and adrenaline isn ‘t produced. No adrenaline because no matter how hard you practice or how much you concentrate on the practice green by it’s very nature practice is repetitive and boring. Deep inside you know that the results don’t matter. You can pretend that this five-footer is to win The Masters but you can ‘t fool your subconscious. If you want to put a little pressure and excitement into your practice sessions either compete with a friend for more money than you can afford to lose or when practicing alone tell yourself (and then live by it) that you can’t quit until you achieve some specific goal such as holing 10 three-footers in a row. We call this “a closer ” and I highly recommend it. (More about it in Chapter 13.)

So if you can’t practice with pressure how do you make practice help your putting on the golf course when it really counts? You could try to avoid pressure on the course but that’s not going to happen. The only way to putt well under pressure is to develop a stroke in practice that works both in practice and on the course when the pressure is on and your muscles are strong. I ‘m not saying you should develop a “pressure stroke ” one that’s different from the stroke you normally practice and use. What I am saying is that you should be smart enough to use your practice time to develop a normal stroke that is the same as your pressure stroke. This is a stroke that doesn’t depend on the strength of your muscles or the speed of your heartbeat. It is a stroke that will work just as well under pressure as in practice. As you’ll see below it’s called a dead-hands stroke.

The Hit Stroke

Let me explain what this “dead-hands” stroke is not. It is not your natural stroke because most golfers’ natural instinct is to “hit” a putt with the muscles of the fingers hands and wrists. Our instincts are developed in our childhood when we play games that involve hitting things turning knobs and manipulating pushing and controlling the objects in our lives with our fingers hands and wrists. This also is the way most people putt because they consider it to be natural. But just because it’s natural does not make it either the right way or the best way.

But golfers hit their putts (Figure 5.3.1). And when a ball is hit the distance it rolls depends on how hard it is hit. The power of the putt depends on the energy or effort put into the stroke. And therein lies the problem: You can’t see or feel the power of a hit before it happens. No matter how much a golfer practices hitting putts the right distance and speed when he or she gets under pressure and tries to apply the same hit to the ball with adrenaline-filled muscles the results will be wrong. Once again as the muscles get stronger the same feel that produced good results in practice produces a more powerful hit under pressure.

Many low-handicap amateurs fall into this trap. They practice with the belief that the harder and longer they work the better they’ll putt under pressure. They believe that putting well under pressure involves courage strength of conviction or some other inner quality of the heart. I suppose these character traits are admirable but they have nothing to do with how far the ball rolls in good putting. If you insist on hitting your putts and controlling your putt distance with your muscles then the only way to practice feel and touch is under pressure. The good player can accomplish this by playing in tournaments in which he is likely to face many pressure putts. Do enough of that – and enough is a lot – and you begin preparing yourself for future pressure situations. Higher-handicap golfers have a slightly different problem. Because hitting

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 117 with the hands is the natural way to putt most golfers begin by doing just that. The results won’t be very good but because the golfer is still new to the game poor putting will seem acceptable. It’s later as these golfers improve their ball-striking and short games and work on bringing their handicaps down that their natural (hand-muscle-controlled) putting stroke limits their ability to score.

Cleobury Mortimer Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Cleobury Mortimer Golf Club

Now, you should be standing up straight, with your chest out, and your shoulders back. Your arms should be out in front of you, your elbows locked, and your wrists level with the height of your waist, while holding the club parallel to the ground. Next, bend over AT THE HIPS until the club touches the ground. Move towards or away from the ball according to where the club touches the ground. After some practice, you will be able to judge the distance well enough so that you don’t have to move around to get into position. Keep your chest out and straight while bending over at the hips. It is impossible to overstate the importance of this. You should not be bending with the back at all to reach down to the ball; you should be bending AT THE HIPS. This is one of the most common mistakes made by amateur golfers. If you look at any professional golfer on television, they will ALWAYS have a straight back, and they will ALWAYS bend at the waist to get to the ball. You will feel like your “seat” is protruding backwards more than usual. That is what we want here. Also, it’s okay if the toe of your club is not flush with the ground. It’s should be that way, especially for the long irons.

Cleobury Mortimer Golf Club