Chipping Sodbury Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Chipping Sodbury Golf Club

About Chipping Sodbury Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Chipping Sodbury Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Chipping Sodbury Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Chipping Sodbury Golf Club

12 miles North East of Bristol (South West England), the course is situated in an area of outstanding natural beauty at the foot of the Cotswold hills and adjacent to the historic, characterful 17th century market town of Chipping Sodbury. We hope you will find what you are looking for in these pages but do not hesitate to contact us if you need any further information or to book your visit.

Chipping Sodbury Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Dimples and Direction

There are two ways dimples can affect how – and where – a ball rolls. First if the putter makes contact on the edge of a dimple rather than the smooth spherical surface the ball can rotate and start slightly off-line. This effect can be significant on short putts but is negligible on long putts when the cover material compresses (as a result of the greater impact velocity). Second balls that are rolling very slowly can wobble along the edges of the dimples as they slow to a stop. This wobble effect is particularly noticeable just before balls stop especially on fast hard greens since this is when they are rolling the slowest (to see this effect greatly exaggerated watch a ball roll to a stop on your smooth hard desktop).

The dimple patterns of six popular brands of balls are shown in Figure 9.10.3.

The larger the dimples and the harder the cover material the more likely contact made on an edge will affect a putt’s roll. Remember on normal putts when the cover material compresses substantially there is essentially no dimple effect. However on putts as short as three or four feet (and anything less) on super-fast greens there can be a measurable effect.

Look at the two ball-putter impact diagrams in Figure 9.10.4. The Dot-Spot (defined as an area of dimple-free spherical surface on the ball) on the left shows perfect contact. The illustration on the right shows contact on the extreme edge of a dimple which would cause a direction error if the ball were hit gently enough that its cover didn’t compress enough to eliminate the effect. Depending on how hard such a putt is hit the directional error could vary from 1/16 inch to /8 inch on a four-foot putt on a fast green (Figure 9.10.5).

Those errors might not seem like very much but it helps to get this effect into perspective. Impact patterns for a number of putts (hit specified distances as marked) are shown in Figure 9.10.6. These patterns were recorded using Teacher Putter Tape (discussed in section 12.3). The patterns show that as the velocity of the putterhead increases (i.e. as putt distances get longer) the cover of the ball compresses more at impact eliminating the chance of making contact on a single dimple’s edge.

Chipping Sodbury Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Rotation isn’t the only lower-body motion to avoid. Some golfers sway back and forth as they putt (Figure 4.10.19). They probably don’t know they’re doing it but the ball doesn’t care what you do or don’t know. One forward inch of sway during a stroke will move your ball about one foot on the green. And that ‘s a foot you probably did not plan on.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 107

A different kind of move is the “peek ” in which the golfer both turns and looks up in the middle of his stroke in an attempt to see the result. Probably the most famous peek was at the 1970 British Open at St. Andrews when Doug Sanders (Figure 4.10.20) missed a 2½-foot putt to drop into a tie with Jack Nicklaus who then beat him in the playoff.

4.11 Putter Fitting

Proper putter fitting is not fundamentally a part of putting stroke mechanics but there’s no doubt that it can help you make better strokes. If the length or lie of a putter is wrong for you you’ll be forced to make compensations in order to putt at all well (Figure 4.11.1). And every characteristic of your putter that is poorly fit to your body size shape setup posture or alignment is one more card stacked against the odds of your executing a pure accurate smooth and noncompensating stroke.

The truth is that most golfers change their strokes to fit their putters when they should be changing their putters to fit their strokes (Figure 4.11.2). They don’t do much in the way of putter fitting in some cases because all they’ve been told about choosing a putter is to use one that they like the looks of. In other instances golfers use whatever putter has been given to them.

You should never change from your proper eye position stance or posture to accommodate a poorly fit putter.

Chipping Sodbury Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Chipping Sodbury Golf Club

First of all, it’s important that you realize that your grip will affect the results that you get. However, it’s not as complicated as the other systems make it out to be. First, grab the club with your right hand so the face of it is toward the target. Keep the face pointed toward the target, while placing your left hand on the bottom of the grip or handle. At this point you should be holding your left hand out flat, so that it is touching the bottom of the grip. Position the joint where your left pinky meets your palm directly underneath the handle of the club. Keep the pinky there and place the first joint in your left forefinger directly underneath the club. Now, do not lift your fingers up, bringing the grip of the club into your palm; instead, hold the handle steady with your left fingers and wrap your palm around the top of the grip. This is an important distinction. Again, don’t wrap the fingers towards the palm, but instead wrap your palm around the top of the club. Now, you should be able to easily place your left thumb directly on top of the club. This should form a V-shape where your left thumb and left forefinger meet. This V-shape should point directly to your right shoulder when it’s complete.

Chipping Sodbury Golf Club