Chilworth Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Chilworth Golf Club

About Chilworth Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Chilworth Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Chilworth Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Chilworth Golf Club

Chilworth Golf Club has been established for over twenty five years, having started with a driving range alone back in 1979. Over the years Chilworth has gone from strength to strength, and now boasts a 5693 yard 18 hole golf course, a team of PGA qualified teaching professionals, a fully licensed bar and restaurant facility, floodlit driving range offering bays both undercover and outside, a well stocked pro-shop with clubs and accessories to suit all budgets, and finally, a relaxed and friendly atmosphere in which everyone is welcome.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

I learned a long time ago that if you learn from your mistakes things usually get better. But if you continue to repeat the same mistakes over and over again things get pretty bad. Then I read a book on learning theory and learned that immediate accurate reliable feedback is the key to efficient learning (Figure 2.7.1). This in fact has become the basis of all my teaching (I wrote about it at great length in my Short Game Bible). The basic notion is that if you don’t know right from wrong in practice there is no way you can improve. If you don’t know a good stroke from a bad stroke in practice you are just as likely to groove the bad one as the better one. If you make a perfect putting stroke from a bad setup position and then blame your miss on stroke path you’ll never learn to set up perfectly. Or if you blame your heart your courage or your self-worth when you miss putts then you’ll never fix your aim your path or the impact problems that truly are at fault.

A student in one of our Scoring Game Schools told me a story. In a laboratory devoted to the methodology of learning scientists were studying how pigeons learn to feed themselves from pellet dispensers. In one cage of pigeons they placed a number of dispensers all of which released one pellet every time a pigeon bumped or stepped on the release lever. Every time the lever was hit a pellet fell out. It took just two days for every pigeon in that cage to learn how to feed itself: hit the lever get a pellet.

There was another cage of pigeons which had the same number of identical-looking pellet dispensers. But these dispensers worked differently. They released pellets randomly. Sometimes pellets were released without the levers being touched. Sometimes they were released when the lever was touched once. And sometimes when the lever was touched nothing would happen. In time some of the pigeons thought that when they lifted their right wing a pellet was released. Some of the pigeons thought that if they chirped they would get a pellet. And some of the pigeons believed that if they turned in circles in front of the dispenser they would get a pellet. In two months none of the pigeons learned to feed themselves. In fact it was humorous watching the second cage: every pigeon practicing a different move hoping to release a pellet.

It reminds me of a practice putting green filled with golfers. One golfer is prac ticing a new grip. Another has widened his stance and is bending over more than he used to while his friend is trying the split-hand grip he saw on television. An other golfer is trying to learn a short backswing and “pop” stroke. All these golfers practicing something that they actually did just before they happened to make a putt hoping it will help them make another one.

And that is what you see if you look at many putting greens today. Golfers practicing practicing and practicing – who knows what they are practicing? – all hoping their putting will improve. Some of them practice a different thing every day and use a different stroke in every round. Some golfers even use several differ ent strokes during one round. Yes sir-ee they remind me of a bunch of pigeons!

Something else you need to think about before actually beginning to work on your stroke are the answers to a few questions. They are important questions but only if you want to know just how good your putting can get: (1) How good are the world’s best putters? (2) How well do you putt now? (3) How good can one get at putting? (4) How good will your putting be in the future?

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

After about 24 years of research I’ve determined that the easiest way to putt (notice I say “easiest ” not “easy”) is to roll putts from the True Roller. As shown in Figure 3.2.1 you can see that there’s no stroke at all: Simply aim the True Roller and then release the ball from the height required to provide it with the necessary speed. Looks easy right? The True Roller never pulls or pushes putts its backstroke never moves inside or outside the line so you might think it would he unbelievably easy to make putts using it. But it’s not that easy because you still have to know where to aim it and how fast and how far to roll the ball.

The True Roller is the easiest way to putt because it is as simple as starting the ball on the right line (in the right direction) and at the right speed. But that doesn’t mean it is easy. I know because I use it all the time in my research to determine the right speed and the right line and it can take me many tries to find the perfect release point and direction. But once I’ve got them I can roll the same putt exactly the same way over and over and over again. And ultimately that’s what you want your putting stroke to do. So the True Roller is as close to the ideal as I’ve found.

Shooting Pool

Not quite as easy as the ‘true Roller but fairly close is rolling the ball as if you are shooting pool. In Figure 3.2.2 I ‘m demonstrating this technique on a practice putting green. l’ve actually putted like this a number of times on a number of dif ferent greens and grass types because it proved to me just how important speed is to good putting. When “pool putting ” starting the ball on the chosen line is sim ple but it doesn’t help you choose the line and giving the ball the proper speed is just as difficult as it is when standing up and using your putter. Again this is not a method I think the USGA should allow. I’m merely explaining that it’s not nearly as easy as you might expect it to be. (If you don ‘t believe me get a pool cue and try using it on some breaking putts on your practice green.) Just as with the True

Roller you have to find the right speed if you hope to make anything.

Both of these methods are easier than other types of putting because they remove or at least reduce the difficulty of starting the ball on the desired line. But the pool method for sure (and to a certain extent the True Roller) is just as difficult as most other methods in transferring the correct speed to the ball.

This is a point worth repeating because most golfers don’t think enough about the speed of their putts. Rather they focus on line. If you are a “line” putter try putting with a pool cue or a True Roller and I promise you’ll learn to appreciate the importance of speed in making putts.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Chilworth Golf Club

At the end of step two, you reached the top of your backswing. As soon, as you get there, start your downswing. As you start the downswing, make sure to remind yourself to keep your arms “connected” to your chest and shoulders. Stay connected all the way through the ball. Your hands and arms only swing as the shoulders rotate. If you start your downswing by rotating your chest, without starting to swing your arms, you will most definitely end up slicing the ball. If you swing your arms before rotating your chest, you will most likely hook the ball. Staying connected will always produce the straightest ball.

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