Chevin Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Chevin Golf Club

About Chevin Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Chevin Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Chevin Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Chevin Golf Club

A product of the golfing boom, which opened half of the country’s present courses between 1880 and 1909, Chevin Golf Club was established in 1894 as a 9 hole course designed by William Lowe, professional to Buxton & High Peak. The course was formally opened on October 13th 1894 by professionals James Braid and Tom Williamson. The clubs existing course of 18 holes covers both parkland and Mooreland terrain with magnificent 5 county views from the Chevin Ridge. The histories surrounding the site include, Palaeolithic to Bronze and Iron Age people and later Roman Legionnaires.The course was first conceived at the ‘Court House Farm’ where the old Court (now a private residence) houses a lock-up where prisoners were kept until their demise close to the 13 hole aptly named The Gibbet.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

The direction that the putter is moving at the moment of impact has very little influence on the starting direction of a putt: Assuming you make contact on the putter’s sweetspot the degree of influence is only about 17 percent (Figure 4.6.1). That means if the putterface is square to the intended starting line and the putter moves across that line at a 10-degree angle as it makes contact the ball will start only 1.7 degrees off-line (17 percent times 10 degrees equals 1.7 degrees).

So you can make a large error in your stroke path and see only a small error in the starting line of your putt. Another way to think of it is this: On a dead-straight five-foot putt your path could travel along a line aimed 13 inches left of the hole center and the ball would still hit the left edge (Figure 4.6.2) assuming you hit the sweetspot and everything else about your stroke was perfect.

As you will see in section 4.8 putterface angle has more effect on the line a pull starts on than does the putter path. But golfers practice putter path because

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 73 it’s easier for them to see their friends (from whom they take advice) can see it and they don’t know what else to practice. I guess it’s not too hard to understand why their putting doesn’t improve.

The Screen Door

For many years Harvey Penick one the game’s greatest teachers taught that the putter should swing open on the backswing and swing closed on the follow-through like a screen door as it moved around a player ‘s body (Figure 4.6.3). He believed that the natural stroke path should move to the inside on the backswing (around a motionless body) and back to the inside on the follow-through. He taught many golfers to become great players including my good friends Tom Kite and Ben Crenshaw and his screen-door concept has been the generally accepted way to putt throughout most of the 50 years I’ve been playing this game.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The true measure of the Tour pros’ putting is indicated by the percentage of putts they make (“convert”) based solely on the length of the putts (shown in Figure 1.4.1 page 7). The shaded curve is data on PGA Tour players taken between the years 1977 and 1992 and shows the spread between the best and worst conversion percentages. It has now been almost 10 years since we measured how well the pros putt and the Pelz Golf Institute is in the process of repeating this test. We hope we’ll find that the percentages have changed in recent years (they remained fairly consistent in the period from ’87 to ’92) as the conditions of greens improve and as players improve their skills (and perhaps as some of our teaching is taking effect).

If you want an answer to question 2 – “How well do you putt?” – you must measure your percentage of putts holed from each distance. You can do this but it will take some effort. You have to record the distance of each putt on your scorecard as you move around the course and indicate those you hole. After 10 to 15

Problems on the Greens 29 rounds (and at least 5 to 10 putts from each distance) you’ll begin to be able to plot your own conversion chart and compare it to those of the pros.

As for question 3 – “How good can one get at putting?” – the answer depends on a number of things: the quality of the greens how well a player reads those greens and the quality of the player’s stroke and touch. Although none of these questions can be answered definitively in this book I assure you that all of the above are getting better all the time. As greens improve putting strokes improve and golfers learn to read greens better a higher percentage of putts from every distance will be made in the future.

Finally “Flow good will your putting be in the future?” That depends on your ability to learn the mechanics of a better putting stroke your ability to learn better putting feel and touch your ability to learn to read greens better and your ability to produce the right stroke at the right time. Depending on your lifestyle your determination and intensity your focus your self-discipline and practice habits and your ability to learn only you can provide this answer.

For most golfers to improve their scores it is often easier to reduce their number of three-putts than it is to increase their number of one-putts. This is generally true for golfers with handicaps greater than 20 although it is even true for some very fine lower-handicap players. As you can see in Figure 2.9.1 the length of the most frequent first putt on greens hit from outside 60 yards is 38 feet. (This distance varies a little with the handicap of the players measured but obviously there are many more long first putts than short ones.) This figure also shows that the most frequent first putt to follow shots hit from inside 60 yards is an 18-footer. If you combine these two curves and add in all the second and third putts that become necessary after the first putt is missed you can see a typical value for the number of putts of each length golfers face per round over a season of golf (Figure 2.9.2).

Now look at the conversion curve for this group of 15- to 25-handicap golfers (Figure 2.9.3) and the frequency with which they three-putt versus the putt distance (Figure 2.9.4). By comparing these data you can see the importance of making short putts as well as learning that you can save several strokes per round by eliminating three-putts from outside 30 feet. This means that you shouldn’t practice only short putts; the long ones are also important. And you must stop three-putting those long ones if you want to be a good putter.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Chevin Golf Club

Focus on using your spine as your axis now. Turn both shoulders and sides directly around your spine. Keep your left arm locked, and your left wrist locked. Although difficult to see from this camera-angle, the triangle is still perfectly in tact.

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