Chesterfield Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Chesterfield Golf Club

About Chesterfield Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Chesterfield Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Chesterfield Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Chesterfield Golf Club

Chesterfield Golf Club was founded in 1897 and its first members played a course in Somersall Park. The Club moved to its present site in 1906 when Somersall Park proved too short. The original Walton course consisted of nine holes, taking in much of the land now occupied by the first six holes together with some which is now a public recreation area. In the late 1920’s the Club acquired Yew Tree Farm and the course was played much as it is now. In May 1939 – four months before war was declared – work started on a new clubhouse to replace the original wooden building, it was opened in December that year. Meanwhile the MOD had requisitioned some land which meant just 9 holes could be played, being the new ones just completed.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Aiming is easy. Everybody aims. It is aiming precisely where you want to aim that is more elusive. The fact that most golfers do a poor job of aiming is not surprising because there’s no feedback on a putting green to teach golfers how to aim properly. In the absence of feedback golfers use two inputs to guide their attempts to aim: First they use their previous putting results (what I call reaction aiming) and second they use the look of their putter relative to their Aimline (what I call position aiming). Further explanations are in order.

Reaction Aiming

The way most golfers aim is to consider past results and then align themselves and their putter to correct for stroke faults and produce the results they want. For example you miss a putt to the left and think “I pulled it ” or maybe “I aimed too far to the left.” Miss several putts left and you think “I must be aiming too far to the left.” So what do you do? You aim to the right. Pretty soon and without realizing you’ve learned to aim consistently to the right as a way of compensating for a stroke that tends to pull to the left.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 65

Data taken in my Scoring Game Schools show conclusively that reaction aiming is a learned skill that most golfers develop as a way to compensate for their putting stroke deficiencies. Players who block their strokes to the right of their Aimline learn to aim to the left of the Aimline. Players who pull their putts to the left learn to aim to the right.

Think about it: Have you ever seen golfers who block putts to the right also aim too far to the right? Of course not. They would miss putts so far to the right it would be ridiculous. They learn to aim to the left and they think this is proper because it produces better results. So the overriding influence on how golfers learn to aim is as a reaction to their results. That is reaction aiming.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

I learned a long time ago that if you learn from your mistakes things usually get better. But if you continue to repeat the same mistakes over and over again things get pretty bad. Then I read a book on learning theory and learned that immediate accurate reliable feedback is the key to efficient learning (Figure 2.7.1). This in fact has become the basis of all my teaching (I wrote about it at great length in my Short Game Bible). The basic notion is that if you don’t know right from wrong in practice there is no way you can improve. If you don’t know a good stroke from a bad stroke in practice you are just as likely to groove the bad one as the better one. If you make a perfect putting stroke from a bad setup position and then blame your miss on stroke path you’ll never learn to set up perfectly. Or if you blame your heart your courage or your self-worth when you miss putts then you’ll never fix your aim your path or the impact problems that truly are at fault.

A student in one of our Scoring Game Schools told me a story. In a laboratory devoted to the methodology of learning scientists were studying how pigeons learn to feed themselves from pellet dispensers. In one cage of pigeons they placed a number of dispensers all of which released one pellet every time a pigeon bumped or stepped on the release lever. Every time the lever was hit a pellet fell out. It took just two days for every pigeon in that cage to learn how to feed itself: hit the lever get a pellet.

There was another cage of pigeons which had the same number of identical-looking pellet dispensers. But these dispensers worked differently. They released pellets randomly. Sometimes pellets were released without the levers being touched. Sometimes they were released when the lever was touched once. And sometimes when the lever was touched nothing would happen. In time some of the pigeons thought that when they lifted their right wing a pellet was released. Some of the pigeons thought that if they chirped they would get a pellet. And some of the pigeons believed that if they turned in circles in front of the dispenser they would get a pellet. In two months none of the pigeons learned to feed themselves. In fact it was humorous watching the second cage: every pigeon practicing a different move hoping to release a pellet.

It reminds me of a practice putting green filled with golfers. One golfer is prac ticing a new grip. Another has widened his stance and is bending over more than he used to while his friend is trying the split-hand grip he saw on television. An other golfer is trying to learn a short backswing and “pop” stroke. All these golfers practicing something that they actually did just before they happened to make a putt hoping it will help them make another one.

And that is what you see if you look at many putting greens today. Golfers practicing practicing and practicing – who knows what they are practicing? – all hoping their putting will improve. Some of them practice a different thing every day and use a different stroke in every round. Some golfers even use several differ ent strokes during one round. Yes sir-ee they remind me of a bunch of pigeons!

Something else you need to think about before actually beginning to work on your stroke are the answers to a few questions. They are important questions but only if you want to know just how good your putting can get: (1) How good are the world’s best putters? (2) How well do you putt now? (3) How good can one get at putting? (4) How good will your putting be in the future?

Let me answer these as best I can:

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Chesterfield Golf Club

Imagine the line that has been drawn is your spine (axis). When the backswing is made, just rotate everything around that axis. If you do this properly, you will be on the correct plane. This correct swing plane will help your power, accuracy, and consistency. Keep the left arm locked as shown.

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