Chester Le Street Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Chester Le Street Golf Club

About Chester Le Street Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Chester Le Street Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Chester Le Street Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Chester Le Street Golf Club

Designed by leading golf course architect JH Taylor, Chester le Street golf club offers a long and particularly testing parkland course with some very tight fairways and excellent views of the surrounding Durham countryside as well as Lumley Castle which neighbours the course. It is fairly flat but still somewhat challenging, and a stern test regardless of how low your handicap may be.

Chester-le-Street Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Green-Reading the 15th Building Block 169 with or against the grain by changing both the amount of the break and the overall distance your putts will roll. If you putt against the grain (that is the grass is growing directly into the rolling ball) its speed will be slowed your putt won’t roll as far and all breaking putts will break a little more than normal (right side of Figure 7.10.2). Putting with the grain not only gives the ball extra speed and distance but also keeps it rolling more on-line and breaking less than normal (center ball track). On long putts the difference in rolling distances can be quite significant (Figure 7.10.3).

If you’ve played in the southern tier of the United Slates you’ve probably putted on Bermuda grass which has broad bristly leaves and a sparse growing pattern and can be especially grainy. But bent grass which is found predominantly in the northern part of the country has grain too just not as strong. Wherever you play try to learn about the strength of the grain before you venture onto the course.

There are a few quick ways to judge the way the grain is running on any green. First look to see if it’s obvious – that is if you can sec that the blades of grass lie all in one direction. Remember grass tends to grow toward water and the sun so look that way first. Then check if you can see the sun ‘s reflection on the grass: If the grass appears whitish or shiny it means the grain is growing away from you; if the grass looks darker you’re seeing a little shade under the blades as you look into the tip ends which means the grain is growing toward you.

Grain will have the greatest effect on a putt near the hole since that’s where the ball rolls slowest. So check how the grass is growing around the hole. Also examine the edges of the cup: One side may look cleanly cut while the other is ragged which indicates how the grass is growing. A clean edge means the grain is growing from that side toward the hole; the ragged edge is on the side of the cup that lost its roots when the cup was cut (that’s why it is ragged because some blades died during the day after having their roots cut off) so the grain runs away from the hole on the ragged side.

Then there’s the “drag test” – simply dragging the leading edge (bottom) of your putterface firmly across the grass to see what happens. If the grass continues to lie flat your drag is in the direction of the grain; if the grass bristles up that’s the against-the-grain direction as seen in Figure 7.10.4 (you may have to drag in a circle to find the pure “against-the-grain” effect). While dragging your putter

Green-Reading the 15th Building Block 171 provides the best test of grain it is illegal under the Rules of Golf to check this way during play or anytime on the day of play. But you can always do it on the practice green and compare the conditions – notably how the different grains look – out on the course. If you’re playing in a tournament and there’s a practice round by all means conduct the drag test and mark the prevalent grain direction on each part of each green in your yardage book or on a scorecard (a typical Tour pro’s yardage book markings are shown in Figure 7.10.5). It’s legal to gather the information beforehand just not on tournament days.

Chester Le Street Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The True Roller

Years ago I created the True Roller a simple ramp device to control the direction and speed of simulated putts (a 1978 photo is shown below). It turns out to be one of the most useful devices I’ve come up with for rolling balls and testing on the greens.

The first True Roller was eight feet long and very cumbersome but later versions have included laser-aiming attachments refined ball-release mechanisms and a level to ensure that the release ramp is always perfectly vertical and releasing balls in a straight line (Figure 2.6.4). The original intent of the True Roller was to simulate putts near the end of their rolls because the initial release of a ball differed from the initial roll of the putted balls (putts start out slightly lofted and sliding along the grass whereas the ball is already rolling as it leaves the True Roller). However after we tested and calibrated the True Roller to simulate putts we found no essential differences in putting results between balls putted versus those released from the True Roller.

You will see many balls and test results from balls rolled from the True Roller in this book. Remember that the True Roller is simply starting each ball in a given direction at the given speed. And that is what putting is all about.

Look next at the top of Figure 2.6.5 which shows how far the same five balls will roll on an uphill putt (released from the True Roller each with the same energy as before). The uphill putts stop closer together (the distance between the longest and shortest balls is 7.5 feet) indicating that on uphill putts balls tend to roll closer to the same distance. This means the roll of an uphill putt is less sensitive to the length of the stroke than putts on a level surface. The lesson is that even if you don’t hit all of your uphill putts the right speed be sure to get them past the hole.

Problems on the Greens 25

That gives them a chance to go in and the longest ones will probably stop near enough to the hole to leave no-brainers coming back.

Chester Le Street Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Chester Le Street Golf Club

The picture at left shows the correct setup position from above. You can see the correct shoulder turn by looking at this picture in conjunction with the picture directly below. Notice that there is no horizontal movement. There should also be no vertical movement. Everything rotates around the spine. Focus on rotating the right side of your body around your spine. The left side will move into place automatically.

Chester Le Street Golf Club