Channel Golf Centre

Golf Lessons at Channel Golf Centre

About Channel Golf Centre

Golf Lessons at Channel Golf Centre

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Channel Golf Centre for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Channel Golf Centre

Set in over 300 acres of undulating parkland, with stunning views of the Essex countryside, is the 14th Century Clubhouse, incorporating our Brasserie restaurant and two meeting rooms. Alongside the clubhouse is our main function suite, the 18th Century thatched Essex Barn. With our dedicated function co-ordinators on hand, you can be assured your day will be unsurpassed. That’s what makes Channels one of the premier locations in Essex.

Channel Golf Centre

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Measuring Green Speed To use a Stimpmeter a ball is placed in the indentation and the device is raised slowly until the ball rolls free and down the groove onto the green (Figure 4.3.3). Care must he taken to hold the Stimpmeter still as the ball rolls down the ramp to ensure constant release energy and ball speed at the bottom of the ramp.

To measure green speed three balls are rolled in one direction on the green measuring how far each ball rolls (in feet) from the end of the Stimpmeter. The same three balls then are rolled in the opposite direction over the same section of the green and again the distances are measured. The six distances are averaged to produce a quantitative measurement of the average distance a ball rolls on that green called the green speed. A slow green is about a 7 (meaning the balls rolled an average of 7 feet) while a fast green comes in at about a 10. Most PGA tournaments aim for green speeds between 10.5 and 11. When greens start rolling at 12 to 13 they are called “Augusta fast ” because that’s often the speed of the greens at Augusta National Golf Club home of The Masters every spring.

Longer rolls (from higher green speeds) for longer times mean the friction of

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 63 the green surface is low letting balls roll farther and longer. A rapidly slowing and short roll off a Stimpmeter means the friction of the green surface is high and the green speed is very slow.

Green speed always affects a putt’s speed and direction of roll (except on dead flat greens where direction is straight no matter what the speed). And the combination of green speed the amount of energy transferred to a putt and the influence of contours and slopes on the greens determines the results of your putts based on how much the putt truly breaks your putt’s initial Aimline and starting speed.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Problems on the Greens 29 rounds (and at least 5 to 10 putts from each distance) you’ll begin to be able to plot your own conversion chart and compare it to those of the pros.

As for question 3 – “How good can one get at putting?” – the answer depends on a number of things: the quality of the greens how well a player reads those greens and the quality of the player’s stroke and touch. Although none of these questions can be answered definitively in this book I assure you that all of the above are getting better all the time. As greens improve putting strokes improve and golfers learn to read greens better a higher percentage of putts from every distance will be made in the future.

Finally “Flow good will your putting be in the future?” That depends on your ability to learn the mechanics of a better putting stroke your ability to learn better putting feel and touch your ability to learn to read greens better and your ability to produce the right stroke at the right time. Depending on your lifestyle your determination and intensity your focus your self-discipline and practice habits and your ability to learn only you can provide this answer.

For most golfers to improve their scores it is often easier to reduce their number of three-putts than it is to increase their number of one-putts. This is generally true for golfers with handicaps greater than 20 although it is even true for some very fine lower-handicap players. As you can see in Figure 2.9.1 the length of the most frequent first putt on greens hit from outside 60 yards is 38 feet. (This distance varies a little with the handicap of the players measured but obviously there are many more long first putts than short ones.) This figure also shows that the most frequent first putt to follow shots hit from inside 60 yards is an 18-footer. If you combine these two curves and add in all the second and third putts that become necessary after the first putt is missed you can see a typical value for the number of putts of each length golfers face per round over a season of golf (Figure 2.9.2).

Now look at the conversion curve for this group of 15- to 25-handicap golfers (Figure 2.9.3) and the frequency with which they three-putt versus the putt distance (Figure 2.9.4). By comparing these data you can see the importance of making short putts as well as learning that you can save several strokes per round by eliminating three-putts from outside 30 feet. This means that you shouldn’t practice only short putts; the long ones are also important. And you must stop three-putting those long ones if you want to be a good putter.

For those not familiar with “lag putting ” some explanations:

• To lag a putt is to minimize thoughts of holing it instead concentrating on stopping the ball as close to the proper distance and as close to the hole as possible thus minimizing the possibility of three-putting (which is first priority).

Channel Golf Centre

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Channel Golf Centre

I want you to understand the purpose of this technique before providing the details. It’s an easy technique that will produce fantastic results. You don’t need to have a long and complicated back swing to send the ball a long way down the fairway. Try taking, what you believe to be, a half swing. The ball will go almost as far. It may not leave the clubface with the same speed, but it also will not slice 40 yards to the right. Which shot would you rather have on a golf course? The drill I’m about to teach you will help you consistently keep the ball in the fairway, and give you better accuracy with all of your clubs.

Channel Golf Centre