Castle Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Castle Park Golf Club

About Castle Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Castle Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Castle Park Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Castle Park Golf Club

Situated in East Lothian, Scotland, Castle Park is an eighteen hole parkland golf course nestled amongst the mature woodlands of the Yester Estate with the Lammermuir Hills providing the backdrop to the South. Stretching to 6,121 yards this par 72 course is naturally undulating on a site that was formerly the deer park for the nearby Yester Castle. The views that surround the course are a feature of your visit to Castle Park. The course has been developed with care and sensitivity to preserve the natural habitat that has been home to local wildlife for decades before.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Croquet-Style

Next on the “easiness” scale (which means it’s a little more difficult than the techniques above) is standing so you face the putting line and putt croquet-style between your legs. Yes this really has been used. Bob Duden and Bob Shave Jr. two PGA Tour pros who had been struggling with their putting used this technique back in the 1960s. I’ve never been sure whether the USGA banned this method because it was too easy too nontraditional or it just looked bad when viewed from behind. It certainly made putting easier because it gave the golfer the best view of the line before the putt and a clear view of what the ball was doing immediately after it started to roll.

Both of these views provide critically important feedback that golfers generally miss when putting in the conventional style (that is standing to the side of the line). Croquet-style putting has other benefits: It removes all rotational motion of the forearms (which opens and closes the putterface during conventional putting) it forces the wrists to remain solid (no breakdown) and it creates the perfect in-line stroke path straight down the intended putting line.

Croquet putting is so easy that it was used by no less a legend than Sam Snead in the mid-1960s (when he was in his mid-fifties) to counter a case of the yips. Snead actually putted this way (Figure 3.3.1) – with one foot on either side of the target line – during the 1966 PGA Championship where he finished tied for sixth. Perhaps it was seeing the great Samuel Jackson Snead putt from the wrong direction or perhaps it was deemed to reduce the skill required to play the game – in any case croquet-style putting was quickly outlawed by golf’s powers that be.

So Sam modified the method slightly changing to “sidesaddle” (Figure 3.3.2)

Methods of Putting 39 doing everything as much as he could the same except bringing both feet to the same side of the target line. Snead continued to putt this way until the end of his competitive career and his creation is I believe the next-easiest way to putt.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Do great putters rotate their putterfaces or do they keep them square through impact?

Because I have advocated the pure-in-line-square (pils) stroke for many years I have often heard from both playing and teaching professionals “But Jack Nicklaus Loren Roberts George Archer Dave Stockton and Ben Crenshaw rotate (screen-door) their putters through impact. Just look at this photograph. See you can see the putterface rotating!”

Then they show me a photo like Figure 4.7.3. Now I want to show you something. Look at the photographs in Figure 4.7.4. On the left you see Perfy my putting robot making a pure-in-line-square stroke with his hands vertically under his shoulders. In the center photograph the perpendicular gridlines show that his putterface stays perfectly square all the way down the line and the right side of the figure shows an incoming view of the same stroke (with different lines to show how perfectly on-line his stroke stays). Okay? You agree Perfy makes a pils stroke from this hands-under-shoulders (vertical pendulum) set-up?

In Figure 4.7.5 I put the camera perfectly face-on to Perfy as he makes the same pils stroke but this time I moved in a little closer and removed the gridlines to emphasize the effect. Now doesn’t that putterface look like it’s rotating screen-dooring through impact? I promise you it is not! Perfy’s swing was no different; it’s only the appearance (an optical illusion) that has changed.

My point is great putters have their putterfaces square to their Aimlines through impact what you see in photographs on TV or in person notwithstanding. That’s one of the reasons they putt so well. If the camera is not on-line or if gridlines aren’t present to reference your vision you can’t believe what you see because of the optical illusions. Even standing face-on watching a player putt at a tournament your eyes (and those of playing and teaching pros) deceive you in the same way. You’ve got to get your eyes (or the camera) either on-line or vertically above a swing motion to see if it’s on-line and rotating or not (as in Figure 4.7.2 where you can accurately compare the rotation of screen-door vs. pits stroke motions).

82 The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics it’s important to realize that the putter shaft is not the pendulum of the stroke and the lie of the putter shaft does not affect the path of your stroke unless it makes you move your hands. Figure 4.7.6 shows the path of a vertical pendulum stroke with two different putters with different shaft angles: You can see that both swing in a pure-in-line-square motion all the way.

Everyone Can Swing On-Line and Square

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Castle Park Golf Club

The chest and shoulders shouldn’t be turning, unless your arms are turning with them. In other words, you want to start your swing with a shoulder turn, but your arms should start swinging at EXACTLY the same time. They are an extension. They are connected. Furthermore, your arms shouldn’t be swinging unless your chest is rotating. Don’t start swinging your arms without starting the shoulder turn. They are connected. Your left elbow remains locked throughout the entire swing. When you complete your shoulder turn, your arms should stop as well. The goal will be to have your left arm exactly parallel to the ground. Your elbow is still locked. When it gets there…STOP. Do not continue to swing your arms.

Castle Park Golf Club