Carlisle Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Carlisle Golf Club

About Carlisle Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Carlisle Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Carlisle Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Carlisle Golf Club

Dear Visitor Carlisle is a fantastic course having hosted the Open Championship Regional Qualifying for the past six years, and I am sure you will have a tremendous day’s golf. We pride ourselves in the Pro Shop on the friendly welcome we extend to our guests and, understand the importance of good organisation to ensure a successful and enjoyable golf day.I would like to take this opportunity to mention our range of services designed to ensure your guests/members have an enjoyable day, while you can save money and be free to host the day more effectively.There are a variety of very low cost effective services to help the preparation and management of the day, which can be tailored to meet your specific requirements.

Carlisle Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

If you ever learned how to ride a bicycle even if it was 30 years ago you will never forget the feeling of how to ride. You may be a little rusty and momentarily forget how to balance your body on the bike but in just a few moments you can ride away almost as if you’d never stopped. This is a good example of long-term muscle memory which is stored in your brain and never forgotten.

Everyone has a second kind of muscle memory called short term – thoughts and sensations that disappear from our bodies and minds at a rate of about 30 percent every eight seconds. Say someone pinches you on the arm: You feel the pinch and it hurts. But it hurts only for a little while the pain fades away and in almost no time the pain is gone and you feel better. The memory of how badly you hurt or what the hurt actually felt like fades quickly. In eight seconds about one third of the feeling is lost. In the next eight seconds another third of what is left goes and on and on until there is nothing left to feel. Most humans operate with this same eight-second clock so it is called the “time constant” of short-term memory. It is also a good measure of your loss of kinesthetic awareness involved in the feel of your golf swing or putting stroke.

Both long- and short-term muscle memories are important in putting. Once you learn and know the feeling of your perfect putting stroke it will reside in your long-term memory and never totally be forgotten. You may not be able to produce it at will immediately after a long layoff but with a little work you’ll do it and just as important you will recognize it. The memories of the good stroke will come flooding hack just the way they do when hopping on a bicycle after a long layoff. That’s the good news.

The bad news is that the short-term feel for your putting stroke motion is subject to the short-term time constant of eight seconds. When does this come into play? As you are learning and practicing putting touch and on the course as you make practice strokes in preparation for the real one.

The way you learn what size stroke is required for each length putt during practice is by trying several and seeing how they look. This is what practice swings are for. After each stroke – whether or not it was the right length to roll the ball the

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 123 perfect distance and speed – your mind consciously and subconsciously correlates your stroke action with the result it would anticipate it to produce. Then when you putt the ball usually rolls for at least four to six seconds or even longer and you need to retain the feel of each stroke for at least that long to maximize the learning of the correlation between the feel of your stroke motion and the result it produced (the roll of your putt). This is why you must learn to hold your follow-through until the ball has stopped moving: As soon as you drop your putter or move your body in a motion unrelated to putting the feeling of the stroke is replaced by the feeling of that motion. Your mind remembers only the body’s most recent sensations and these too fade by 30 percent every eight seconds.

Carlisle Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

So if you don’t know that downhill putts break more than uphill putts on the same slope (covered in Chapter 7) then you won’t be making many downhill-breaking putts. Or if you believe that Bobby Locke and Ben Crenshaw struck their putts with overspin to make them dive into the hole then it’s unlikely that you’ll work on those aspects of your putting that actually can help you putt better (see section 4.9).

It might seem about now that I’m being very negative about putting that I’m pointing out how hard it is how much you don’t know and how much you have to learn to be a good putter. I’m not trying to he negative but I am trying to point out how much you have to learn. Learning is what good putting is all about: It’s not hard to putt well; it is hard to learn how to putt well. And the difference is crucial. I place much of the blame for the difficulty in learning squarely on the putting green. The green provides a very poor environment in which to learn.

Standing on the putting green golfers have no idea why they miss putts or why they make them. After missing a putt (even on the practice green) most golfers assume their stroke mechanics were to blame. However they may have stroked a perfect putt but it hit a hard-to-see footprint which caused the putt to miss the hole. Or they might make a putt and assume they stroked it perfectly when they actually hit a terrible putt but misread it just the right amount to compensate and – only luck can explain it – roll it into the hole.

I learned a long time ago that if you learn from your mistakes things usually get better. But if you continue to repeat the same mistakes over and over again things get pretty bad. Then I read a book on learning theory and learned that immediate accurate reliable feedback is the key to efficient learning (Figure 2.7.1). This in fact has become the basis of all my teaching (I wrote about it at great length in my Short Game Bible). The basic notion is that if you don’t know right from wrong in practice there is no way you can improve. If you don’t know a good stroke from a bad stroke in practice you are just as likely to groove the bad one as the better one. If you make a perfect putting stroke from a bad setup position and then blame your miss on stroke path you’ll never learn to set up perfectly. Or if you blame your heart your courage or your self-worth when you miss putts then you’ll never fix your aim your path or the impact problems that truly are at fault.

A student in one of our Scoring Game Schools told me a story. In a laboratory devoted to the methodology of learning scientists were studying how pigeons learn to feed themselves from pellet dispensers. In one cage of pigeons they placed a number of dispensers all of which released one pellet every time a pigeon bumped or stepped on the release lever. Every time the lever was hit a pellet fell out. It took just two days for every pigeon in that cage to learn how to feed itself: hit the lever get a pellet.

There was another cage of pigeons which had the same number of identical-looking pellet dispensers. But these dispensers worked differently. They released pellets randomly. Sometimes pellets were released without the levers being touched. Sometimes they were released when the lever was touched once. And sometimes when the lever was touched nothing would happen. In time some of the pigeons thought that when they lifted their right wing a pellet was released. Some of the pigeons thought that if they chirped they would get a pellet. And some of the pigeons believed that if they turned in circles in front of the dispenser they would get a pellet. In two months none of the pigeons learned to feed themselves. In fact it was humorous watching the second cage: every pigeon practicing a different move hoping to release a pellet.

It reminds me of a practice putting green filled with golfers. One golfer is prac ticing a new grip. Another has widened his stance and is bending over more than he used to while his friend is trying the split-hand grip he saw on television. An other golfer is trying to learn a short backswing and “pop” stroke. All these golfers practicing something that they actually did just before they happened to make a putt hoping it will help them make another one.

Carlisle Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Carlisle Golf Club

The follow through is now complete. The forearms are completely crossed, showing that you have gotten your hands through the ball. It may take a few days to get used to this new “left elbow close-to-side, forearms crossed-at-finish” concept. It will come though. It’s one of the best things you can do for your golf swing. No more blocking to the right or uncontrollably slicing the ball!

Carlisle Golf Club