Cardiff Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Cardiff Golf Club

About Cardiff Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Cardiff Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Cardiff Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Cardiff Golf Club

Cardiff Golf Club, founded in 1922, is a 6,000 yard parkland course with a variety of mature trees which requires accurate tee shots and coupled with the small to medium size greens demands a high standard of approach shots. The course is well bunkered and an added hazard is a small stream meandering through the course. Playing the course is a most pleasurable experience, where it is difficult to imagine that you are in the environs of Wales’s largest and Capital city.The clubhouse, the construction of which was completed in 1998, provides spacious and comfortable facilities to both member and visitor alike and includes bars, restaurant and lounge. On the ground floor is located the Professional, Terry Hanson’s Golf Shop where you can find a wide range of golfing equipment and also high quality advice and tuition from Terry and his staff.

Cardiff Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

A Five-Step Routine

Assume you have walked off your putt distance finished reading the green and decided to play your putt dead-straight into the cup. It is now time to start your routine. In position – standing directly behind your ball on your selected Aimline – I recommend you build a routine that includes the following steps:

Step 1. While standing approximately six feet behind your ball in a fairly upright posture with your eyes in a horizontal position imagine your entire ball track from the ball into the hole and as you do so make three preliminary practice swings (Figure 11.2.1). The purpose of these swings is to get a first feel and vision of the stroke length required for this putt. Do this with your head up so your eyes are horizontal providing perfect binocular vision of the distance. Look at the hole as you feel your swing and try to imagine if your swing feels about the correct size

Establish Your Practice Framework 223 to roll the perfect putt on the perfect ball track. Focus on the hole to see and feel the distance to it. Make your second swing while looking down at your stroke. Follow this with another look to the hole again to judge and feel the distance.

Step 2. Walk to your ball along the extension of your Aimline. Try to keep your head and eyes directly above your Aimline (Figure 11.2.2) and internalize the

224 Establish Your Practice Framework direction of the Aimline in your body and your mind’s eye as you walk and feel the slope of the ground under your feet.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Starting your putts on your chosen initial line is primarily a function of your stroke mechanics specifically aiming your putter properly and striking it with a good path and square face angle. That’s the easy part. Imparting the proper initial speed is significantly more difficult because it involves stroke mechanics (making solid contact on the sweetspot) as well as putting “feel” and “touch” for distance plus your ability to read greens.

Taking a Trip

Stick with me here as I equate the skills of putting touch feel and green-reading on the golf course to what you do when taking a Thanksgiving drive to your parents’ house. First to have a nice trip you need to know how many miles you have to drive and how much of the trip is mountain driving. With that knowledge you can figure out how much gas you need to make it there. This is like having touch in putting which is knowing how long the putt is so you can then figure out how much power will be required in your stroke to get the ball to the hole.

And you’d better know how much gas you need before starting the trip because there are no filling stations (putting stroke adjustments) along the way (after you hit the ball).

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 113

Once you know how much gas you need then you have to figure out how hard to step on the gas pedal and when to step on the brakes as you drive on your Thanksgiving trip (something you figure out after you are into the trip) to negotiate the stops and turns in the road along the way. This “knowing how to drive” is analogous to knowing how to feel the proper stroke in putting where you must know in your mind’s eye the required size of the swing (or hardness of the hit) as well as how it will look and feel to impart the power which will provide the proper energy and speed of roll required. So touch is knowing how long the trip is and how much power it will require and feel is knowing how to apply the power (how to drive) to get you there.

Of course good touch and feel also require a proper read of the green knowing what will happen to your putt as it rolls. Think of green-reading as having a good road map for your journey. A good map or good directions can make the trip easy but a bad map with poor directions can turn the simplest trip into a nightmare.

Cardiff Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Cardiff Golf Club

The chest and shoulders shouldn’t be turning, unless your arms are turning with them. In other words, you want to start your swing with a shoulder turn, but your arms should start swinging at EXACTLY the same time. They are an extension. They are connected. Furthermore, your arms shouldn’t be swinging unless your chest is rotating. Don’t start swinging your arms without starting the shoulder turn. They are connected. Your left elbow remains locked throughout the entire swing. When you complete your shoulder turn, your arms should stop as well. The goal will be to have your left arm exactly parallel to the ground. Your elbow is still locked. When it gets there…STOP. Do not continue to swing your arms.

Cardiff Golf Club