Carden Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Carden Park Golf Club

About Carden Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Carden Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Carden Park Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Carden Park Golf Club

Whatever your reason for visiting Carden, you will quickly realise that you have arrived at a very special place. Carden Park has been a significant Cheshire estate since the 17th century. With its superb selection of 196 bedrooms and luxury suites, impressive conference and banqueting facilities, a luxurious spa and spectacular golf courses, we are confident that this hotel will cater for your every need and be the ideal venue for your stay. Having recently invested 2.5 million GBP on bedroom refurbishments, each of the 196 executive rooms are newly designed to an exceptionally high standard.

Carden Park Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Improve Your Stroke Mechanics

12.1 Refine Your Path

At last we are ready to work on your stroke mechanics. And work on them we must for they are what cause the ball to move. But instead of heading to the practice green as most golfers do – to putt for hours hoping something good will hap-pen – you now know there are 15 ways (the 15 building blocks) to improve your putting and grooving your stroke path is just one of them. Even more important you know the stroke path you want to groove (pure-in-line) and you are committed to grooving it within a system of feedback rhythm flow lines routine and a ritual that won’t let practicing this one area ruin some other aspect of your putting. You even believe that once you learn this path you will be able to execute it under pressure on the golf course. Good because believing in what you are doing is key to making it happen. So let’s get to it.

I’ve already explained why the pure-in-line-square (pils) stroke (Figure 12.1.1) is the simplest and best. So grooving a perfect pils stroke would be ideal but it should not be your goal. Because you are human it will be impossible for you to be perfect every time. Your stroke will sometimes wobble and swing off-line. You’re going to have less-than-perfect days. But that should not deter you. You can groove an almost perfect pils stroke which you’ll execute almost all of the time and that is very good. With an almost perfect stroke you’ll almost make all of your putts which is what the great putters do.

Put It in the Track

If you are willing to practice your stroke for a few minutes every few days in a Putting Track your pure-in-line path will improve (Figure 12.1.2). How quickly is up to you: The faster you want to improve the more often you practice and the more time you spend during each practice session (in that order because frequent

Carden Park Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

I mentioned briefly that you can miss the sweetspot both horizontally and vertically. So a word about hitting putts high or low on the face. Most golfers habitually make contact at roughly the same height on their putterface. As long as this height is about four-tenths of an inch above the sole where most putters are designed to be hit this is good.

But some golfers try to hit up on their putts to produce overspin or topspin and in doing so usually contact the ball very low on the putterface near its bottom. This is bad because it causes hand and muscle control of the putter (subjecting you to the effects of adrenaline) and can even result in some putters rotating over the ball if hit hard enough (Figure 4.9.3). Such rotation can actually impart more backspin on a ball than the hitting-up motion removes. (1 prefer backweighted-low putter designs to eliminate this problem.) Hitting up on the ball also raises the effective putter loft which can launch a ball up off the green and produce a bouncing and therefore inconsistent putt.

Having said this there is one situation in which I recommend either hitting up on your putts or using a more-lofted-than-normal putter. When you find yourself putting on soft and severely bumpy greens you might want to try launching your short puns slightly upward to avoid the footprints that would send them squirting left or right. True this is not a great stroke but on truly bad surfaces it may be the least had of your options.

Spinning Puffs

Forget here and now the idea of imparting spin as a way to control your putts. Research has shown that the friction of the green removes all spin from rolling halls

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 93 within about the first 20 percent of their roll. Despite this golfers think that Ben Crenshaw became a good putter by learning to put overspin on his putts and that Bobby Locke put “hook spin” on his putts which made them dive into the hole. Neither of these descriptions is true but amateur golfers believe them because they sound reasonable and give them something new to try in their own putting. (They also give amateurs an excuse for not putting better. Trust me: Most amateurs don’t need any more excuses.)

Still many golfers and even some teaching professionals extol the benefits of “releasing” the putter through impact rotating the face from open to closed to impart hook spin or overspin. Again all reasonably well-stroked putts can be shown to be rolling without any spin whatsoever when they reach the hole. So trying to release the putter makes no sense unless it encourages you to follow through in your stroke and eliminates deceleration and instability. However even in this case releasing the putter will produce more face rotation and give you more inconsistency in directional control due to increased timing problems.

Carden Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Carden Park Golf Club

At this point the right wrist is completely on top of the left wrist. Your hands are “through the ball”. You have continued to rotate around your spine, and you have tried to stop the left elbow on the imaginary line. This is the primary action for amateur golfer to increase power, while reducing slice.

Carden Park Golf Club