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Golf Lessons at Capel Bangor Golf & Country Club

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Golf Lessons at Capel Bangor Golf & Country Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Capel Bangor Golf & Country Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Capel Bangor Golf & Country Club

Capel Bangor Golf Club is a hidden gem with exceptional golf together with facilities which offer informal luxury and seamless service to the golfer and non golfer alike. It is set in 40 acres of superbly landscaped panoramic parkland overlooking the beautiful Rheidol Valley.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Because speed and line are intertwined you can look at this situation in the opposite way. There are many speeds at which any given putt can be made and for each of those speeds there is a most desirable or optimum Aimline. By rolling thousands of putts one speed would prove to have the greatest rate of success and that would be the optimum speed for that putt. The Aimline associated with it would be the optimum Aimline. Just as important as knowing that there are many makable Aimline/speed combinations realize that there are many more combinations that have no chance of finding the hole. For example any line/speed combination that leaves a putt short is no good. And any combination that had enough speed to roll the ball more than approximately eight feet past the hole is similarly out of the question. (The exact distance varies due to the green speed the condition of the back edge of the hole and the slope.) Suffice it to say eight feet past is roughly the maximum speed at which any Aimline can work.

8.5 The Lumpy Donut

If lots of speed/Aimline combinations roll the ball into the hole why is one better than all the rest? Why does one produce a higher percentage of putts made? Blame the greens.

The surfaces of most putting greens are not perfect. Unless you’re in the very first group of the day (and even that doesn’t guarantee perfection) the greens will be covered with footprints pitch marks from incoming shots and spike marks that can and will knock rolling balls off-line. Furthermore the edges of the hole often are worn down beat up or improperly cut. All of these imperfections get worse as the day goes on (more footprints more spike marks more pitch marks). That’s why whenever I watch a Tour event and see a player in one of the last groups make an important putt I applaud the player for both his (or her) good putting and good luck in negotiating the minefield of bad conditions between the ball and the hole.

The most influential of these imperfections without a doubt arc the footprints made by golfers near the hole. Golfers can’t help it. Most miss their first putt so they must putt a second time usually from within six feet of the hole. Then they have to get within six inches or so of the hole to retrieve their ball. As a result there is a high-density ring of footprints around every hole. But at the center of this ring is an area with no footprints at all; it’s within six inches of the hole and golfers know never to step that close. So around every hole is something that looks like a donut – a few feet of high-density footprints surrounding a raised circle one foot in diameter that is absolutely clean. Years ago I started referring to this area as the “lumpy donut” (Figure 8.5.1).

Every golfer should be aware of the lumpy donut because it can influence every putt that has a chance of finding the hole. I’ve run countless tests through the lumpy donut rolling putts at different speeds to see how they were affected. What I found was that the slower a ball rolls as it approaches the cup the more

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Golfers the world over have made a tacit agreement to think of break as measured from the edge of the hole rather than the center. Unless the putt breaks less than half the width of the hole. Then we refer to it as breaking from somewhere inside the cup such as an “inside left edge” or “right center ” to the center of the hole. Only then do we acknowledge that our target is the center of the hole.

Let’s be sure that you understand the terms I’ve defined so far. You’ve cleaned your ball on the green and replaced it in front of your mark. Standing behind your ball on the ball-hole line you realize that if you putt directly along that line it will break to the left and miss below the hole. So you move slightly downhill from the

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 57 ball-hole line and try to imagine how far uphill to the right you must start your putt if you want to make it. You select an Aimline which runs about 28 inches outside the right edge of the hole you walk to the ball set up perfectly along your new Aimline and make practice strokes until ready. You execute the perfect stroke and your ball starts exactly on your Aimline. You guessed the right amount of break (28 inches) and gave your putt the perfect speed so as it rolls it breaks gently to the left and into the center of the cup. Your ball track formed the perfect arc (Figure 4.1.6) the ball entered the exact center of the hole (centered relative to the ball track) and all is right with the world.

4.2 Stroke Definitions

Where are you aiming? Sooner or later 1 ask that question of every golfer I work with. Aim is a critical aspect of putting (more on that later) and both you and I need to know not only where you are trying to aim (where you think you are aiming) but also where you are actually aiming your putter your stance and your stroke.

Technically when I refer to aim I am referring to a direction. The direction of your aim can be at a place like the edge of the hole or at an object such as a discolored piece of grass a spike mark or anything you can see and define. What you choose to aim at can be anywhere along your Aimline from just in front of the ball to alongside or even past the hole. Your aim can be one inch one ball three balls a foot or even 10 feet outside the right or left edge of the cup or it can be anywhere inside the cup. Only after you determine how much you expect your putt to break and define somewhere or something to aim at can the direction of your aim your Aimline be visualized located or marked on the green.

The track along which your putter travels is your “putter path. ” It can move straight back and straight through in-line with your Aimline it can cut across from outside-to-in or inside-to-out (shown in Figure 4.2.1) or it can loop around your Aimline. Golfers take their putters severely or slightly inside and outside their Aimlines waver along their Aimlines and sometimes incorporate a bit of all of the above into their putting paths. I believe there are almost as many distinct putter paths as there are golfers and I’m sure I haven’t seen them all.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Capel Bangor Golf & Country Club

Here is a view from the front. The goal of this photo is to show that there is no lateral movement. Simply rotating your right shoulder around your spine.*Please note that you should NOT be cocking your wrists at the end of your backswing. While this may add a bit of power, it will totally throw off your timing. The results of a wrist cock are slices, hooks, fat shots, etc.

Capel Bangor Golf & Country Club