Caldwell Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Caldwell Golf Club

About Caldwell Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Caldwell Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Caldwell Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Caldwell Golf Club

The Club was established in 1903 and we recently celebrated our centenary year. We are situated just outside the village of Uplawmoor off the A736 in Renfrewshire, this makes it easily accessible from both Glasgow and Ayrshire. Click here for a map showing the club’s location.It is a parkland course (par 71) and is set in the quaint surrounds of the Renfrewshire countryside, and offers a most enjoyable test of golf. There are a number of eye catching holes although most visitors agree that the Par 3 third stays in the memory forever.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Since majoring in physics at Indiana University I have believed in the scientific method. To my way of thinking it is better to test and measure that something is true than it is to assume or think or hope it’s true. That’s why even though we give every incoming student a questionnaire to fill out before beginning one of our three-day schools (we want to know their thoughts and opinions relative to their short games and putting games) we also measure everyone’s putting once the school starts. We test their ability to hole putts in all of the makable lengths and measure how well they lag putts from long distances. We measure their ability to aim their putterface and the orientation of the flow-lines of their body in the address position. We measure their stroke paths face-angle rotation impact patterns and ability to read greens. We use laser beams slow-motion and stop-action video and specially designed skill tests to measure what they need to improve.

The Improvement Process 215

There’s nothing worse than working hard on the wrong thing expecting improvement from it then ending up with nothing.

In our three-day schools we have the time and equipment necessary to perform all these measurements accurately on facilities specially designed to teach the short game and putting. I point this out not because I’m trying to sell schools but because I want you to know what is available and what is the best way to learn to putt better.

There are some things we can’t measure in schools and clinics statistics only the golfer can keep track of. For example it’s particularly informative to analyze one’s missed-putt pattern to see if there is a favorite way of missing. We invariably find that there is a miss preference although golfers sometimes deny this until someone accumulates the data and shows it to them.

We quantify misses by breaking them into nine categories or zones (Figure 10.2.1) and keeping a record of them over time. Once you know if there is a pattern and if so which one it becomes easier to deal with whatever is causing it. Several of the games described in the next few chapters were developed to retrain golfers’ subconscious habits resulting in the elimination of such patterns.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Both Arnold and Tiger like to force things to happen to control their putts and make them do what they want them to do. And we all know that they both have so much talent they perform this way very well. I think however they would both putt better if they used less hit and more stroke in their putting motions. (What do I mean? Have you ever seen Arnold or Tiger blow a short putt four feet past the hole? That’s what I mean.)

No matter what provides the power there are two big drawbacks to a power stroke. First is the likelihood of a “power surge ” which can be caused by adrenaline resulting from anxiety or excitement; this significantly degrades the touch of most players under pressure. Second is the uncertainty of controlling the wrist hinge if there is one when the muscles are tight under pressure. Either way consistency usually suffers.

Methods of Putting 43

Next down the easiness scale comes the “pop stroke ” which was used quite successfully by both Gary Player and Johnny Miller early in their careers. The backstroke is shorter than normal and there’s virtually no follow-through after impact so the ball is “popped ” or jabbed forward (Figure 3.5.4). Neither Miller nor Player stuck with the pop stroke through his career because they said it lacked consistency; when I’ve asked them about this method neither would recommend it. However both won many tournaments popping their putts so it may not be as bad as they recall.

The pop stroke does have one advantage and that is it keeps the putterface angle essentially square at all times which is a good thing. However it uses the muscles of the hands and arms for power and is therefore a difficult method to use if you want to develop really good touch.

One of the more interesting putting techniques in golf history is the so-called “hook stroke” of the great South African Bobby Locke who won more than 80 tournaments worldwide between the 1930s and ’50s including four British Opens. Many golfers have told me that Locke put hook spin on his putts which made them dive into the hole. That may have been what both they and Locke thought but I’m sure it was not the case.

I’ve seen photographs of Locke from which 1 can imagine that his stroke traveled on an in-to-out path with the putterface slightly closed through impact (Fig

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Caldwell Golf Club

First of all, it’s important that you realize that your grip will affect the results that you get. However, it’s not as complicated as the other systems make it out to be. First, grab the club with your right hand so the face of it is toward the target. Keep the face pointed toward the target, while placing your left hand on the bottom of the grip or handle. At this point you should be holding your left hand out flat, so that it is touching the bottom of the grip. Position the joint where your left pinky meets your palm directly underneath the handle of the club. Keep the pinky there and place the first joint in your left forefinger directly underneath the club. Now, do not lift your fingers up, bringing the grip of the club into your palm; instead, hold the handle steady with your left fingers and wrap your palm around the top of the grip. This is an important distinction. Again, don’t wrap the fingers towards the palm, but instead wrap your palm around the top of the club. Now, you should be able to easily place your left thumb directly on top of the club. This should form a V-shape where your left thumb and left forefinger meet. This V-shape should point directly to your right shoulder when it’s complete.

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