Caldecott Hall Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Caldecott Hall Golf Club

About Caldecott Hall Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Caldecott Hall Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

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As well as the 18 hole golf course, there’s an interesting 18 hole par three course which demands the use of a range of clubs. The golf course is configured as two loops of nine holes eminating from the clubhouse and is inviting with views from the first tee over much of the opening nine holes which is set on undulating land.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Green-Reading the 15th Building Block 145

When the break is greater than 2½ inches we measure it from the nearest edge of the hole outward and don’t bother to mention the other 2½ inches to the center of the hole. So the three breaks shown in Figure 7.2.3 would be referred to as three feet left to right one inch outside the left edge and six inches outside the right edge.

They All Under-Read the Break Knowing how break is defined is definitely not the same as being able to see and predict how much a putt will break (curve) on a real green for a real putt. Most

Almost all putts break one way or the other. Measurements show that about 98 percent of putts have at least some break or curvature in their roll to the hole. This occurs because greens are built with slight inclines to shed water. There are no dead-flat greens as they would create small depressions where water would pool after rain inhibiting grass growth and subsequent play. The only putts that don’t break are those that run straight uphill or straight downhill along the pure “downhill” or “fall line” direction of a green (as shown in Figure 7.2.4). Only about 2 percent of all putts line up purely along these lines. putts break and golfers know it. Yet in testing more than 1 500 golfers including 50 PGA Tour professionals I discovered an amazing truth about putting. Not one of these players was reading as much break as actually existed on any one of their putts. In fact most didn ‘t even come close to reading anywhere near the true break.

As shown in Figure 7.2.5 when I asked them to tell me how much break they saw or point to how much break they were going to play on a putt (where their Aimline extended as it passed the hole) most golfers saw only about 30 percent of the actual true break that existed for that putt. Think about that: If the real break was three feet (and 1’d measured it with the True Roller) they saw only about one foot; or if it was one foot they saw a little less than four inches. The PGA Tour pros were a little better reading slightly more break but even they saw only about a third or 33 percent of the actual amount of true break. Both those percentages have changed slightly since I first reported them because we changed how we

Green-Reading the 15th Building Block 147 defined break (as measured at the hole distance instead of perpendicular to the ball-hole line).

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Roller you have to find the right speed if you hope to make anything.

Both of these methods are easier than other types of putting because they remove or at least reduce the difficulty of starting the ball on the desired line. But the pool method for sure (and to a certain extent the True Roller) is just as difficult as most other methods in transferring the correct speed to the ball.

This is a point worth repeating because most golfers don’t think enough about the speed of their putts. Rather they focus on line. If you are a “line” putter try putting with a pool cue or a True Roller and I promise you’ll learn to appreciate the importance of speed in making putts.

3.3 It Gets More Difficult

So we’ve disposed of two methods that no one can or should be allowed to use. What about some techniques that have been tried and in some cases are still in use?

Croquet-Style

Next on the “easiness” scale (which means it’s a little more difficult than the techniques above) is standing so you face the putting line and putt croquet-style between your legs. Yes this really has been used. Bob Duden and Bob Shave Jr. two PGA Tour pros who had been struggling with their putting used this technique back in the 1960s. I’ve never been sure whether the USGA banned this method because it was too easy too nontraditional or it just looked bad when viewed from behind. It certainly made putting easier because it gave the golfer the best view of the line before the putt and a clear view of what the ball was doing immediately after it started to roll.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Caldecott Hall Golf Club

Really flip your right wrist through the ball. This action will give you a lot more club head speed. It also eliminates any slice that you may have had because your left elbow isn’t flying on the follow through anymore. So, essentially you’re keeping the left elbow close to the body now. Before it was your right, and now it’s your left elbow that you are keeping tight to your body. Keep your left elbow close to your body, and flip the right wrist through the ball at the same time. You should feel the extra power this gives you.

Caldecott Hall Golf Club