Cadmore Lodge Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Cadmore Lodge Golf Club

About Cadmore Lodge Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Cadmore Lodge Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Cadmore Lodge Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Cadmore Lodge Golf Club

Welcome to the Cadmore Golf Club. The club is open to residents and club members. The course has nine holes and starts from the Lodge providing some opportunities for challenging shots. For a photograph tour of the Golf course and Hotel, click on the link below.

Cadmore Lodge Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Develop Your Artistic Senses (Feel Touch Green-Reading) 307 trying to roll each putt exactly to the edge of the green without touching it. As you walk to your three balls notice if you were putting with or against the grain. Then putt the balls back in the opposite direction over the same distance to the edge of the green to see if you can detect any differences caused by the grain. Doing this several times won’t take long and will adjust your touch for the unfamiliar greens.

“Draw-Back” is the best game of all for developing and refining touch for putts longer than 35 feet. Because the odds of making long putts are so poor the real skill in lag putting is rolling your putts consistently close to the hole taking the pressure off your short putting and eliminating any chance of three-putting. And Draw-Back is designed to develop exactly that skill. (The rules are listed in Figure 13.2.5.)

The reward in Draw-Back comes in lagging your first putt close enough to the hole so that after drawing it back 34 inches the next putt is significantly less than six feet so the probability of making it is great. You can play Draw-Back by yourself but you will learn far more quickly if you play nine-hole games in competition with good lag putters and with something at stake. (1 don’t want to encourage gambling for money you might not have but you need to care about winning each hole and each game if you are to see maximum improvement.)

Never play Draw-Back on putts of less than 35 feet. If you do the training to your subconscious is to lag those close rather than trying to maximize your make-percentage by rolling them 17 inches past the hole.

308 Develop Your Artistic Senses (Feel Touch Green-Reading)

Safety-Drawback

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Standing behind the ball trying to read the green most golfers decide how much they think the putt is going to break and then where they are going to aim. They select a point or a direction where they intend to start their putt and we refer to the line from the ball to that point or direction as the “Aimline ” or desired initial starting line of the putt (Figure 4.1.3). It’s best called the Aimline because it is the line along which you align your body feet and (it’s hoped) your stroke because you want to start the ball rolling along that line. It ‘s where you’re aiming. If everything was figured properly the ball starts on your Aimline and will roll the proper speed and break (because of the slope of the green) gently into the cup.

The entire path that your putt takes is the “ball track” (left side of Figure 4.1.4). It may remind you of the “action track” sometimes used on television to show how a ball has traveled. The distances between the balls on the track indicate how fast (relatively) the putt is traveling: Farther apart means it is rolling faster; closer together and it is rolling slower. A detailed ball track provides an accurate understanding of a putt’s entire motion – both where and how fast it was going – better even than the same putt recorded and played back on videotape.

The amount or size of the “break” played on a putt is a measure of the difference between the direction you aim and start the putt rolling and where you want it to go. We define the amount of break as the distance between the Aimline (up by the hole) and the nearest edge of the hole measured along a line between the two (right side of Figure 4.1.4). The actual amount the ball breaks (curves) is something different because the ball track ideally curves into the center of the hole. But golfers refuse to deal with that detail. When golfers say they are playing one inch of break what they mean is that their Aimline passes one inch outside the edge of the hole as shown in Figure 4.1.5. Technically they expect the putt to break 3¼ inches – one inch plus half the diameter of the hole (2½ inches) – but they insist on thinking and saying that they are playing one inch of break.

Golfers the world over have made a tacit agreement to think of break as measured from the edge of the hole rather than the center. Unless the putt breaks less than half the width of the hole. Then we refer to it as breaking from somewhere inside the cup such as an “inside left edge” or “right center ” to the center of the hole. Only then do we acknowledge that our target is the center of the hole.

Let’s be sure that you understand the terms I’ve defined so far. You’ve cleaned your ball on the green and replaced it in front of your mark. Standing behind your ball on the ball-hole line you realize that if you putt directly along that line it will break to the left and miss below the hole. So you move slightly downhill from the

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 57 ball-hole line and try to imagine how far uphill to the right you must start your putt if you want to make it. You select an Aimline which runs about 28 inches outside the right edge of the hole you walk to the ball set up perfectly along your new Aimline and make practice strokes until ready. You execute the perfect stroke and your ball starts exactly on your Aimline. You guessed the right amount of break (28 inches) and gave your putt the perfect speed so as it rolls it breaks gently to the left and into the center of the cup. Your ball track formed the perfect arc (Figure 4.1.6) the ball entered the exact center of the hole (centered relative to the ball track) and all is right with the world.

4.2 Stroke Definitions

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Cadmore Lodge Golf Club

As you can see in the image to the left, the back remains straight while bending over to the ball. All of the bending is done at the hips. Bending at the waist and keeping a straight back will promote great ball flight and consistency. The relationship between the arms and chest has not changed.

Cadmore Lodge Golf Club