Bulbury Woods Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Bulbury Woods Golf Club

About Bulbury Woods Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Bulbury Woods Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Bulbury Woods Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Bulbury Woods Golf Club

Bulbury Woods Golf Club near Poole in Dorset offers a challenging 18 hole course with spectacular views towards Poole Harbour and the Isle of Purbeck. Although only built in 1989 the course has plenty of character and precision is definitely more important than power as you wind through ancient woodlands and gentle undulations. A warm welcome and efficient service awaits in the exceptional quality Clubhouse, which offers impressive bar and restaurant facilities, and great views over the 18th. The course is a popular venue for society days and there’s an additional meeting room on the first floor which is ideal for conferences and seminars.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Read Greens Better Make More Putts

If you practice this way (without compensations) while simultaneously learning to read greens better you are well on your way to becoming a great putter. This system works because you learn a noncompensating in-line stroke and learn to read greens better at the same time. This system works because when you do both correctly you are rewarded by making more putts. This is in contrast to what has happened over the years to golfers who worked hard to learn simple noncompensating strokes then found they didn’t work (they missed too many putts) when they took them to the golf course and continued to underread the break in their putts. Of course they didn’t realize that their poor green-reading was the cause of the problem.

By being open-minded understanding about subconscious compensations and learning how to putt on greens without them you open the door for your conscious mind to feel free to read the proper (true) break. When you do both (read true break and use noncompensating strokes) you make putts. With accurate (true break) Aimlines when you make better strokes – with no compensations and solid impact a square face angle through impact and better touch – your putts go into the hole. As you continue to practice making noncompensating strokes and the better you read the true break of your putts the more putts you will roll into the center of the hole.

This situation allows you to commit to that simple noncompensating stroke

I talked so much about earlier in the book – the pure-in-line-square stroke: the best easiest and most reliable way to putt. It will work for you now because when you read the true break in putts you no longer need had setup positions and in- stroke compensations to have a chance to make them.

The key then is to learn to read greens more accurately to see the true amount of break your putts will take and at the same time improve your putting stroke mechanics to allow you to make noncompensating strokes on the greens. Throw in developing better touch and feel and all this starts to get really exciting.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The small amount of wrist hinge each employs is done down the line so it doesn’t cause directional difficulty. When I’ve asked them about this motion they all say that their best putting days come when the stroke is more pendulum and less wrist. More proof that simplicity is the key ingredient in good putting.

The “right-hand push ” or “push stroke ” used by Jack Nicklaus has been a repeatable reliable performer for a long time. A friend once told me that Jack really wasn’t that good a player: He was just on a 30-year hot streak! Indeed Jack has putted consistently well throughout most of his career. Even today Jack’s putting remains unshakable perhaps the strongest part of his game.

Look at Figure 3.5.10 and you can see his right arm and hand arc behind the left pushing the putter through impact like a piston firing straight down the line. There is no putter rotation no forearm rotation and no wrist breakdown through the impact zone. The push stroke at its best and Jack at his best are and were almost unbeatable.

Methods of Putting 49

We are nearly at the simple end of the USGA-approved putting techniques. And it’s here that you encounter the long-putter method which is probably one option the ruling body would like to outlaw. But as long as it remains legal I suggest you give it a try (if for no other reason than to experience the feel and vision of a true pendulum motion). Because when done properly the long putter creates a wonderfully simple stroke (as demonstrated by Sam Torrance of the European Tour on the left side of Figure 3.5.1 1).

The solid shaft of the long putter eliminates any chance of wrist hinge or breakdown and minimizes the tendency to rotate the putterface with your forearms. I’ve tested thousands of students in my Scoring Game Schools and found that the majority of them make more putts of six feet or less with a long putter than when putting any other way including the conventional way. It is a very simple way to putt especially on short putts.

My tests also show that the long putter hanging vertically (from under the chin) is marginally more effective than the long putter anchored against the chest (right side of Figure 3.5.11) and better than the midlength putter anchored below the chest. But all three of these options because they employ a longer-thannormal-length shaft eliminate the problem of wrist breakdown that hampers many golfers.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Bulbury Woods Golf Club

First of all, it’s important that you realize that your grip will affect the results that you get. However, it’s not as complicated as the other systems make it out to be. First, grab the club with your right hand so the face of it is toward the target. Keep the face pointed toward the target, while placing your left hand on the bottom of the grip or handle. At this point you should be holding your left hand out flat, so that it is touching the bottom of the grip. Position the joint where your left pinky meets your palm directly underneath the handle of the club. Keep the pinky there and place the first joint in your left forefinger directly underneath the club. Now, do not lift your fingers up, bringing the grip of the club into your palm; instead, hold the handle steady with your left fingers and wrap your palm around the top of the grip. This is an important distinction. Again, don’t wrap the fingers towards the palm, but instead wrap your palm around the top of the club. Now, you should be able to easily place your left thumb directly on top of the club. This should form a V-shape where your left thumb and left forefinger meet. This V-shape should point directly to your right shoulder when it’s complete.

Bulbury Woods Golf Club