Bude North Cornwall Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Bude & North Cornwall Golf Club

About Bude & North Cornwall Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Bude & North Cornwall Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Bude & North Cornwall Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Bude & North Cornwall Golf Club

The Bude & North Cornwall Golf Club (surrounded by the town and the sea) is a challenging links course established in 1891. Excellent drainage enables the course to be playable throughout the year off regular tees and greens, making it one of Cornwall’s finest golf courses. Visitors and societies are made welcome and our excellent (newly refurbished) bar and restaurant are open all year.”The finest greens in the West” Probably!

Bude & North Cornwall Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

I’m not an astronaut but I did work for NASA during the years of the Mercury

Apollo 13 crippled the spacecraft halfway to the moon almost costing the lives of three astronauts.

Green-Reading the 15th Building Block 143 and Apollo space missions. I was a research scientist at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland studying the aeronomy (physics and chemistry) of Earth and our near planetary atmospheres involved in launching satellites and then trying to figure out what the returning data meant (Figure 7.L2). In 1975 I turned the focus of my research from outer space to golf and I have been studying testing and teaching the game ever since. Today as founder of the Pelz Golf Institute which is designed to study and understand the game so we may teach golfers to play better and enjoy it more I say “Golfers – We have a problem.”

All right maybe this isn’t quite as serious as a crippled space capsule halfway to the moon. But for the 27 million golfers in this country (and the millions more worldwide) the problem is very real. I feel like the astronaut who knows there’s a serious problem but nobody believes. So I’ll say it with details. “Golfers – We have a problem because you don’t know how to read greens you are consistently under-reading the break this is causing you to miss many putts you could otherwise make and it’s screwing up your putting strokes too.”

This is not the first time I’ve said this. After researching this problem for five years I reported the problem to the World Scientific Congress of Golf in St. Andrews Scotland in July 1994 then published a 1995 cover story in GOLF MAGAZINE titled “The Amazing Truth About Putting” relating some details. But the golfing public has neither understood nor solved the problem. Only the PGA and LPGA Tour professionals and some of our school students have fully understood the problem learned how to get around it and improved their putting as a result.

Now once and for all l want you to understand:

Bude & North Cornwall Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

It might seem about now that I’m being very negative about putting that I’m pointing out how hard it is how much you don’t know and how much you have to learn to be a good putter. I’m not trying to he negative but I am trying to point out how much you have to learn. Learning is what good putting is all about: It’s not hard to putt well; it is hard to learn how to putt well. And the difference is crucial. I place much of the blame for the difficulty in learning squarely on the putting green. The green provides a very poor environment in which to learn.

Standing on the putting green golfers have no idea why they miss putts or why they make them. After missing a putt (even on the practice green) most golfers assume their stroke mechanics were to blame. However they may have stroked a perfect putt but it hit a hard-to-see footprint which caused the putt to miss the hole. Or they might make a putt and assume they stroked it perfectly when they actually hit a terrible putt but misread it just the right amount to compensate and – only luck can explain it – roll it into the hole.

I learned a long time ago that if you learn from your mistakes things usually get better. But if you continue to repeat the same mistakes over and over again things get pretty bad. Then I read a book on learning theory and learned that immediate accurate reliable feedback is the key to efficient learning (Figure 2.7.1). This in fact has become the basis of all my teaching (I wrote about it at great length in my Short Game Bible). The basic notion is that if you don’t know right from wrong in practice there is no way you can improve. If you don’t know a good stroke from a bad stroke in practice you are just as likely to groove the bad one as the better one. If you make a perfect putting stroke from a bad setup position and then blame your miss on stroke path you’ll never learn to set up perfectly. Or if you blame your heart your courage or your self-worth when you miss putts then you’ll never fix your aim your path or the impact problems that truly are at fault.

A student in one of our Scoring Game Schools told me a story. In a laboratory devoted to the methodology of learning scientists were studying how pigeons learn to feed themselves from pellet dispensers. In one cage of pigeons they placed a number of dispensers all of which released one pellet every time a pigeon bumped or stepped on the release lever. Every time the lever was hit a pellet fell out. It took just two days for every pigeon in that cage to learn how to feed itself: hit the lever get a pellet.

There was another cage of pigeons which had the same number of identical-looking pellet dispensers. But these dispensers worked differently. They released pellets randomly. Sometimes pellets were released without the levers being touched. Sometimes they were released when the lever was touched once. And sometimes when the lever was touched nothing would happen. In time some of the pigeons thought that when they lifted their right wing a pellet was released. Some of the pigeons thought that if they chirped they would get a pellet. And some of the pigeons believed that if they turned in circles in front of the dispenser they would get a pellet. In two months none of the pigeons learned to feed themselves. In fact it was humorous watching the second cage: every pigeon practicing a different move hoping to release a pellet.

It reminds me of a practice putting green filled with golfers. One golfer is prac ticing a new grip. Another has widened his stance and is bending over more than he used to while his friend is trying the split-hand grip he saw on television. An other golfer is trying to learn a short backswing and “pop” stroke. All these golfers practicing something that they actually did just before they happened to make a putt hoping it will help them make another one.

And that is what you see if you look at many putting greens today. Golfers practicing practicing and practicing – who knows what they are practicing? – all hoping their putting will improve. Some of them practice a different thing every day and use a different stroke in every round. Some golfers even use several differ ent strokes during one round. Yes sir-ee they remind me of a bunch of pigeons!

Bude & North Cornwall Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Bude & North Cornwall Golf Club

Here is a view from the front. The goal of this photo is to show that there is no lateral movement. Simply rotating your right shoulder around your spine.*Please note that you should NOT be cocking your wrists at the end of your backswing. While this may add a bit of power, it will totally throw off your timing. The results of a wrist cock are slices, hooks, fat shots, etc.

Bude & North Cornwall Golf Club