Brynhill Barry Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Brynhill Barry Golf Club

About Brynhill Barry Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Brynhill Barry Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Brynhill Barry Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Brynhill Barry Golf Club

Brynhill golf club is a picturesque 18 hole course situated in the Vale of Glamorgan. The club caters for all ages and standards of golfer, offering a superb environment to progress your game. Brynhill prides itself on its friendly atmosphere, challenging parkland course and excellent hospitality. The club offers coaching and advice through its full time professional, as well as offering a well stocked shop including all major brands of golfing equipment and clothing.Whether you are a family looking for regular golf, a beginner taking your first steps in the game or a business looking for top-class corporate facilities, Brynhill has something to offer you.

Brynhill Barry Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Loft Angle

The loft of a putterface can he defined several ways but only one matters to you. You need only care about its effective loft – that is the loft angle relative to the surface of the green at the moment of impact (Figure 11.6.17). This is not necessarily the loft of the face relative to the shaft and it certainly is not the loft of the face relative to the sole of the club. The effective loft of your putter is what determines

258 Establish Your Practice Framework where your putter makes contact – above on or below the ball’s center of mass.

This point of contact combines with the angle of approach of the putter to determine the initial launch conditions of your putt. And yes putts do “launch”: Depending on how they are struck they can launch down into the surface of the green skid horizontally across the green surface or launch upward – and do any of those with backspin overspin or no spin at all.

I recommend that you launch your putts ever so slightly upward to get them on top of the grass as quickly as possible without giving them so much loft that they bounce on the green. Because balls tend to sit down in the grass and footprints this slight upward launch helps prevent them from having to start their roll through these potential hazards. One or two degrees of loft – relative to the surface of the green through impact – is usually enough. (If you’re putting on grass with very strong grain or on very bumpy surfaces use a few more degrees of loft to get the ball on top of the blades more quickly.) As I mentioned earlier about ball position (section 11.5) the best results occur when impact is made with your putter traveling slightly up and away from the bottom of your stroke arc.

Offset and Onset

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

This should convince you that even with the perfect path poor face angle at the moment of impact will start your putts off-line big-time.

Do you still think putter path is as important as face angle? Reposition the piece of wood to produce a path at 45 degrees to the right of your Aimline and hold the putterface square to the Aimline aiming straight at the hole. Again use both hands to control face angle and path and slide the putterface along the edge of the wood. This stroke – with perfect face angle but 45-degree off-line path (Figure 4.8.3) – starts the ball only about 7 degrees off of the Aimline.

So if you are going to make a stroke error of 45 degrees which result would you rather see? A putt off-line by 7 degrees or 37 degrees? I’m sure you now agree with me that if you want to putt consistently along your intended Aimline you’d better learn to keep your putterface angle square to that line (the square face angle advantage of the pils vs. screen-door stroke should

Perfectly Square … Never! now be obvious). And if you have some free time Trying to get your putterface square what part of your stroke are you going to practice? at impact with a screen-door stroke is Right again: Spend at least four times more time like trying to be “exactly on-time.”

You can never do it. You’re either working on keeping the face angle square to your early or you’re late by a minute a sec-Aimline than you do on perfecting your stroke ond a millisecond or a nanosecond. If path (details in Chapter 12). your putterface is rotating through impact it’s almost always open or

4.9 The Very Important Impact Point closed and you will be penalized for being either one at impact (it’s just a Putter path is somewhat important to good putt- matter of how much). It will never be ing. Putterface angle is four times more important. square – and certainly never consis-And guess what? Your impact point – where you tently square when you need it! make contact with the ball – is even more important still!

The point of contact between your putter and the ball determines how much energy is transferred to the ball at the moment of impact. And the amount of energy your putts receive determines both how fast and far the balls will roll and how much your putts will break. Most golfers believe the distance their putts roll is determined strictly by the length and force of their swing. That’s true only if they transfer a consistent percentage of energy from putter to ball at impact. And that is seldom the case.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Brynhill Barry Golf Club

Hold the club steady with your right hand, and place left hand underneath the club as shown. The first joint of the left forefinger should be directly on the bottom of the handle, as well as the last joint of your left pinky. Once you have placed your palm on top of the club, do the same with your left thumb. Place it directly on top of the handle of the club. Next, interlock the left forefinger, and the right pinky. Nudge your right hand all the way towards the bottom of the grip. Now again, wrap the right palm all the way around the top of the grip. Don’t hold the grip of the club in your right palm. You should be able to cover up your left thumb with your right palm if you’ve done it correctly. You’ll see another V-shape being made where your right thumb and right forefinger meet. As a check, this V should be pointing directly at your right shoulder. If it doesn’t point at your right shoulder, rotate your hand on the grip so that it does. Your fingers should be giving the club most of the support it needs, NOT your palms.

Brynhill Barry Golf Club