Brookmans Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Brookmans Park Golf Club

About Brookmans Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Brookmans Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Brookmans Park Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Brookmans Park Golf Club

Brookmans Park Golf Club is one of Hertfordshire’s best-kept secrets. Widely recognised, by all discerning golfers fortunate enough to have played here, as a challenging and rewarding test for players of all abilities.Located some 3 miles from J24 on the M25, the 6,473-yard par 71 woodland course has been host to the Hertfordshire County Championships for all categories – men, ladies and juniors.Whether you are hosting a corporate golf event, society day of looking for a green fee, Brookmans Park Golf Club has something for you.

Brookmans Park Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Your impact point refers to the center of the contact area between your ball and putter on the putterface (Figure 4.2.3). For each and every putt there is one unique impact point which sometimes centers on a single dimple but more often several dimples plus an edge of one or more dimples. After many putts your many impact points will form your impact pattern (Figure 4.2.4) which is very important to the success of your putting. Aim path face angle and impact pattern are four of the 15 building blocks fundamental to your putting stroke mechanics. They describe and define how you move your putterhead and how your putterhead moves through the impact zone determines how well you roll your ball relative to your Aimline.

4.3 Defining Speed

Putt Speed

The velocity with which a ball moves along the green can be referred to in several ways. Some golfers refer to this as the rolling speed or speed of the putt. Some golfers talk about the pace of a putt while others talk about how fast a putt is moving. It would be nice if we all could mean and understand the same thing when referring to speed.

Technically the speed of a putt can be described and measured in quantitative terms as the velocity of motion (in units of inches or feet per second) in a given direction and the decay or decrease of velocity (the velocity profile) as the ball rolls to a stop. However since most golfers don’t think in technical terms on or off the course the actual velocity of a putt at any instant is neither very meaningful nor useful. As a result golfers talk about the speed of their putts as being too fast too slow or just about right as they approach the hole.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 61

Brookmans Park Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Three Pendulums

In my first book on putting Putt Like the Pros which was published about 10 years ago I pointed out that a pure-in-line stroke path along the Aimline was the easiest most natural and best putter path to use (Figure 4.6.4). However it turns out that many golfers including some golf professionals never read or understood the concepts that determined this to be a natural motion and continue to believe and teach that the putter should swing around the body in the screen-door semicircular motion as shown in Figure 4.6.5. To understand why the in-line stroke motion is the simplest way to putt you must first understand the mechanics of the way pendulums swing. Three pendu

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 75 lums are illustrated in Figure 4.6.6. Each is swinging from a fixed point with pendulum A swinging vertically below its suspension point describing a back-andforth in-line path along a straight line. Pendulum B is swinging at a 20-degree angle to the vertical supported by a small force shown by arrow B and describing a curved path around the spot directly below its suspension point. Pendulum C is swinging at the opposite 20-degree angle supported by arrow C in a curved motion in the opposite direction around the spot below its suspension point.

All three pendulums are describing pure pendulum motions (the pendulum rhythm will be discussed in section 6.3) which occur in a gravitational field such as that found on Earth. But only pendulum A swings with gravity helping to determine its straight in-line path without any rotation or curvature of the swing path. As you can see both pendulums B and C require outside forces to keep them moving in circular motions.

Now relate these pendulums to putting strokes by attaching putters to the bottom of each pendulum. Pendulum B is what Harvey Penick prescribed: The golfer’s hands hang outside of his shoulder line (the suspension point) at some angle supported by the force B (shown by Justin Leonard in Figure 4.6.7). This puller will describe a curved path around the body like a screen door as long as no hand or arm muscles prevent it from doing so.

In Figure 4.6.8 Fuzzy Zoeller simulates pendulum C by holding his hands inside of his shoulders and at an angle to his suspension point. This putter clearly rotates from outside the Aimline going back to outside the Aimline on the follow-through (the opposite of the screen-door rotation of pendulum B). Again this is a natural pendulum motion but it requires a small force (C) to keep his hands and his I5-degree angle to the vertical below the suspension point.

In these two examples of pendulums B and C it is clear that small side forces are required to make these strokes acceptable for putting and both strokes involve curved paths rotating around the golfer’s body. Now look at pendulum A as a putting stroke which involves no side force or curving path.

Brookmans Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Brookmans Park Golf Club

At the end of step two, you reached the top of your backswing. As soon, as you get there, start your downswing. As you start the downswing, make sure to remind yourself to keep your arms “connected” to your chest and shoulders. Stay connected all the way through the ball. Your hands and arms only swing as the shoulders rotate. If you start your downswing by rotating your chest, without starting to swing your arms, you will most definitely end up slicing the ball. If you swing your arms before rotating your chest, you will most likely hook the ball. Staying connected will always produce the straightest ball.

Brookmans Park Golf Club