Brookdale Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Brookdale Golf Club

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Golf Lessons at Brookdale Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Brookdale Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Brookdale Golf Club

Nestled in the shadow of Mt. Rainier and the beautiful Cascade Mountains, Brookdale Golf Club brings you the best in Northwest golfing. With Clover Creek traversing its gentle slopes and tall evergreen trees that surround the fairways, Brookdale offers nothing less than pure golfing enjoyment.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Green-Reading the 15th Building Block 161

If the slope on a green is constant then the faster a ball rolls between its starting point and the hole the less it will break. This occurs because the faster a ball rolls the less time gravity has to act upon it (Figure 7.9.3). But there is a caveat to this situation. If you are going to roll your putt faster so you can play less break you’d better make the putt because it’s still going to break later on the other side of the hole as it slows down. And while it is slowing down it will be rolling away from the hole. This can be a problem when you attempt to make the putt coming back.

This rule – the faster the roll the less the break (on any given slope) – holds whether the faster ball speed is caused by the golfer initially rolling the putt faster because the green is slow or rolling it faster on a fast green to minimize the break. And while that rule is true so is its opposite: The slower you roll a ball to the hole (as long as you still get it there) the more it will break.

The High Road Is Best

There is more than one possible Aimline (initial starting line) along which every breaking putt can be made. Roll the ball at different speeds and it will need different Aimlines to find the hole. For example roll the ball faster and it will take less break so the Aimline doesn’t need to allow for as much break; conversely roll the ball slower so it breaks more and the Aimline must feature a larger break allowance.

And so there are the extreme Aimlines. At one extreme is the “highest-possibletrue-break” Aimline. This works if the ball is rolled at its slowest possible speed with just enough pace for the ball to die (on its last hit of turn) downhill into the front edge of the cup (Figure 7.9.4 left).

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

By starting with the putterface square to the line and using this pure-in-line stroke the ball would have to start rolling on that line. The pendulum swings this way because gravity is the only force acting on the stroke: There are no rotating forces to turn the putterface away from the target line and no side forces to push the putter off the straight Aimline path.

Now imagine a minor modification to this putter a lightweight but much longer face (Figure 4.6.9A`’). With this change the putter would still swing perfectly in-line beneath the shoulders and there still is nothing to cause rotation or circular motion in the stroke. In Figure 4.6.9A’ we’ve added a lightweight but rigid connection from the grip to the putterface near its toe. Assuming this connection is truly lightweight and doesn’t change the putter’s balance the swing path still would not change still would not rotate and would naturally continue to swing in-line along the straight line path beneath the shoulders.

Finally having seen how this putter swings with both shafts now look what happens when the vertical part of the shaft is removed in Figure 4.6.9A”. By removing the original vertical shaft (which hung under the hands) and the back of the putterface we have turned this into a normal-looking putter which still swings in a pure-in-line path as before. This face (again assuming the putter was balanced perfectly) will not rotate open or closed and will not swing or curve around the body. The natural swinging motion of this putter will be purely in-line along a line exactly parallel to his shoulder line. In other words this putter path will track right down the Aimline the intended line of the putt.

4.7 A Pure-In-Line Stroke Keeps the Putterface Square

Section 4.6 should prove to you that a pure simple pendulum can swing in three different motions all of which can relate to a putting stroke. The pendulum of a putting stroke (assuming the golfer has a pendulum and doesn ‘t hit with his hands or wrists or move his body) is the pendulum formed between his suspension point (between his shoulders) and his hands (Figure 4.7.1). And it is this position of a golfer’s hands the angle of his pendulum relative to vertical that determines not only the natural swing path of his putterhead but also the behavior of the putterface angle relative to the Aimline. (Note: your elbows and forearms don’t have to be under your shoulders just your hands.)

As shown on the bottom in Figure 4.7.2 when the golfer’s hands (pendulum

(A) = no rotation; Inclined (B) and (C) = screen-door rotations.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Brookdale Golf Club

At the end of step two, you reached the top of your backswing. As soon, as you get there, start your downswing. As you start the downswing, make sure to remind yourself to keep your arms “connected” to your chest and shoulders. Stay connected all the way through the ball. Your hands and arms only swing as the shoulders rotate. If you start your downswing by rotating your chest, without starting to swing your arms, you will most definitely end up slicing the ball. If you swing your arms before rotating your chest, you will most likely hook the ball. Staying connected will always produce the straightest ball.

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