Bridport West Dorset Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Bridport & West Dorset Golf Club

About Bridport & West Dorset Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Bridport & West Dorset Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Bridport & West Dorset Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Bridport & West Dorset Golf Club

A warm welcome awaits golfers at Bridport & West Dorset Golf Club. It is situated on the World Heritage Jurassic Coast and is a natural cliff-top course with stunning views over Lyme Bay, Chesil Beach and the Dorset Countryside. The course measures 5,875 yards, par 70 from the visitors’ tees and 6,213 yards, par 71 from the competition tees.

Bridport & West Dorset Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

At last we are ready to work on your stroke mechanics. And work on them we must for they are what cause the ball to move. But instead of heading to the practice green as most golfers do – to putt for hours hoping something good will hap-pen – you now know there are 15 ways (the 15 building blocks) to improve your putting and grooving your stroke path is just one of them. Even more important you know the stroke path you want to groove (pure-in-line) and you are committed to grooving it within a system of feedback rhythm flow lines routine and a ritual that won’t let practicing this one area ruin some other aspect of your putting. You even believe that once you learn this path you will be able to execute it under pressure on the golf course. Good because believing in what you are doing is key to making it happen. So let’s get to it.

I’ve already explained why the pure-in-line-square (pils) stroke (Figure 12.1.1) is the simplest and best. So grooving a perfect pils stroke would be ideal but it should not be your goal. Because you are human it will be impossible for you to be perfect every time. Your stroke will sometimes wobble and swing off-line. You’re going to have less-than-perfect days. But that should not deter you. You can groove an almost perfect pils stroke which you’ll execute almost all of the time and that is very good. With an almost perfect stroke you’ll almost make all of your putts which is what the great putters do.

Put It in the Track

If you are willing to practice your stroke for a few minutes every few days in a Putting Track your pure-in-line path will improve (Figure 12.1.2). How quickly is up to you: The faster you want to improve the more often you practice and the more time you spend during each practice session (in that order because frequent

Improve Your Stroke Mechanics 271 short sessions are more beneficial than infrequent long sessions).

The Putting Track is the king of stroke-path feedback devices because it defines the perfect path for your stroke and never lies about how you are doing: You’ll hear and feel when you make a bad stroke while you’ll hear nothing and feel pure “nothingness” when you make a good one. The Track is inexpensive easy to set up and use and you can take it with you when you travel. It works at home in your office

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Forget here and now the idea of imparting spin as a way to control your putts. Research has shown that the friction of the green removes all spin from rolling halls

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 93 within about the first 20 percent of their roll. Despite this golfers think that Ben Crenshaw became a good putter by learning to put overspin on his putts and that Bobby Locke put “hook spin” on his putts which made them dive into the hole. Neither of these descriptions is true but amateur golfers believe them because they sound reasonable and give them something new to try in their own putting. (They also give amateurs an excuse for not putting better. Trust me: Most amateurs don’t need any more excuses.)

Still many golfers and even some teaching professionals extol the benefits of “releasing” the putter through impact rotating the face from open to closed to impart hook spin or overspin. Again all reasonably well-stroked putts can be shown to be rolling without any spin whatsoever when they reach the hole. So trying to release the putter makes no sense unless it encourages you to follow through in your stroke and eliminates deceleration and instability. However even in this case releasing the putter will produce more face rotation and give you more inconsistency in directional control due to increased timing problems.

The Razor-Blade Putter

Because so many people assume that putts can spin all the way to the hole and are obsessed with the idea of overspin I built a putter that let me examine and evaluate the benefit of true overspin. I embedded a razor blade just above the center of a putterface (Figure 4.9.4) making sure the sharp edge of the blade would contact the ball above its geometric center and impart true overspin.

I tested the razor-blade putter versus an identical putter with a normal face and counted how many putts each one holed. On very short putts – inside three feet – the razor putter performed pretty well. However on longer putts it created true initial overspin that caused the balls to “grab” on the green and jump forward uncontrollably.

But there was more. If the grass was damp or I was putting against the grain the overspin didn’t take and the ball didn’t travel as far; when the grass was dry or when putting with the grain the spinning ball grabbed and jumped forward to roll widely divergent distances. So overspin if you could create it causes inconsistency. Which is why I say “Forget about it!”

Bridport & West Dorset Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Bridport & West Dorset Golf Club

Now, you should be standing up straight, with your chest out, and your shoulders back. Your arms should be out in front of you, your elbows locked, and your wrists level with the height of your waist, while holding the club parallel to the ground. Next, bend over AT THE HIPS until the club touches the ground. Move towards or away from the ball according to where the club touches the ground. After some practice, you will be able to judge the distance well enough so that you don’t have to move around to get into position. Keep your chest out and straight while bending over at the hips. It is impossible to overstate the importance of this. You should not be bending with the back at all to reach down to the ball; you should be bending AT THE HIPS. This is one of the most common mistakes made by amateur golfers. If you look at any professional golfer on television, they will ALWAYS have a straight back, and they will ALWAYS bend at the waist to get to the ball. You will feel like your “seat” is protruding backwards more than usual. That is what we want here. Also, it’s okay if the toe of your club is not flush with the ground. It’s should be that way, especially for the long irons.

Bridport & West Dorset Golf Club