Bridlington Links Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Bridlington Links Golf Club

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Golf Lessons at Bridlington Links Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Bridlington Links Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Bridlington Links Golf Club

Set in 210 Acres Overlooking Bridlington Bay, ‘THE LINKS’ Has Something For Everyone! Bridlington Links is the top quality golfing venue, perched on this magical part of England’s heritage coast that still manages to exceed expectations…

Bridlington Links Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

I Never Realized This Myself

I’ d done all the research. I’d known for years that golfers were under-reading the true break in putts. I’d been pleading begging my students to look at their putts and watch how much they broke to learn they needed to play three times as much break as they used to think they were playing. I promised that if they did they could stop their subconscious compensations and they would make more putts. But I’d been asking them the whole time to putt along a line they had no chance to see because it is invisible to them.

It was a day in the fall of 1999. As I watched putts roll over and over through our hole bridge which marks the hole for putts without affecting their roll as shown in Figure 7.7.4 (on left) on a perfect ball track I realized that no ball ever

Green-Reading the 15th Building Block 157 came close to the true break point. At that moment I saw (in my mind’s eye) the true break and the visible break for the first time at the same time. When I saw both breaks simultaneously I was almost paralyzed. I realized that I ‘d never truly understood how balls curve as they break along their tracks. I had always imagined that they moved rapidly after first being struck rolling along the line they started on for a good distance up to their apex before curving quickly down to the cup as they lost speed toward the end of the roll (Figure 7.7.4 right). But that is clearly not the case. In fact if you look again at the real ball track on this 9-foot putt and compare it to my previously imagined ball path you can see how bad my imagination had been. Can you see why I (and perhaps you) thought these putts broke less? If you are an apex putter (you imagine and aim at an apex) and you look up and see the ball at what you assume is its apex (but is really only its visible break) rolling down into the hole the next time you see a putt on a slope like this you’ll under-read it for sure.

I immediately measured and learned that the visible break of most putts is only about a third of the true break. A third! I finally understood why my students couldn’t see the true break even when I was beating on them to look for it. It’s hard to sec something that never appears before you (the true-break Aimline) especially when something that looks so real (your ball rolling on the visible-break ball track) is right in front of you. So the eyesight of the 1 500 golfers I tested was not so bad after all. The amateurs had seen most of the visible break and the Tour pros had seen all of it. The problem was they thought the visible-break apex was where they had aimed and stroked their putts. They were totally unaware of their subconscious compensations to pull or push their starting lines up near the true-break Aimline in order to get their putts to roll there!

7.8 Gut-Feel Putting

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Problems on the Greens 29 rounds (and at least 5 to 10 putts from each distance) you’ll begin to be able to plot your own conversion chart and compare it to those of the pros.

As for question 3 – “How good can one get at putting?” – the answer depends on a number of things: the quality of the greens how well a player reads those greens and the quality of the player’s stroke and touch. Although none of these questions can be answered definitively in this book I assure you that all of the above are getting better all the time. As greens improve putting strokes improve and golfers learn to read greens better a higher percentage of putts from every distance will be made in the future.

Finally “Flow good will your putting be in the future?” That depends on your ability to learn the mechanics of a better putting stroke your ability to learn better putting feel and touch your ability to learn to read greens better and your ability to produce the right stroke at the right time. Depending on your lifestyle your determination and intensity your focus your self-discipline and practice habits and your ability to learn only you can provide this answer.

For most golfers to improve their scores it is often easier to reduce their number of three-putts than it is to increase their number of one-putts. This is generally true for golfers with handicaps greater than 20 although it is even true for some very fine lower-handicap players. As you can see in Figure 2.9.1 the length of the most frequent first putt on greens hit from outside 60 yards is 38 feet. (This distance varies a little with the handicap of the players measured but obviously there are many more long first putts than short ones.) This figure also shows that the most frequent first putt to follow shots hit from inside 60 yards is an 18-footer. If you combine these two curves and add in all the second and third putts that become necessary after the first putt is missed you can see a typical value for the number of putts of each length golfers face per round over a season of golf (Figure 2.9.2).

Now look at the conversion curve for this group of 15- to 25-handicap golfers (Figure 2.9.3) and the frequency with which they three-putt versus the putt distance (Figure 2.9.4). By comparing these data you can see the importance of making short putts as well as learning that you can save several strokes per round by eliminating three-putts from outside 30 feet. This means that you shouldn’t practice only short putts; the long ones are also important. And you must stop three-putting those long ones if you want to be a good putter.

For those not familiar with “lag putting ” some explanations:

• To lag a putt is to minimize thoughts of holing it instead concentrating on stopping the ball as close to the proper distance and as close to the hole as possible thus minimizing the possibility of three-putting (which is first priority).

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Bridlington Links Golf Club

This is a different view of the complete follow through. Your forearms are crossed, and that is the sign that you have completed the follow-through correctly Keep your head perfectly still during the entire swing This is the last crucial step that you must master. It’s by far the easiest step, but ironically it will produce the most results. The biggest problem is that you don’t always know when you are moving your head. You may find that swinging easier helps keep the head still, but other than that it is just something that you will have to really concentrate on.

Bridlington Links Golf Club