Bowood Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Bowood Park Golf Club

About Bowood Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Bowood Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

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Bowood Park Golf Club

Set in the heart of North Cornwall in 230 acres of rolling hills and woodland, designated an area of Special Landscape Value, the Bowood Park estate once formed part of a 13th century deer park owned by Edward Prince of Wales formerly known as The Black Prince. Bowood is now home to a luxury 31 room three star hotel with an award-winning restaurant, and outstanding golf course.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

4.6 Putter Path Is a Small Factor

I’m fairly sure there are almost as many different putting paths as there are golfers. And it seems there are as many ways to stand over (address) a putt too. Even for the same golfer each day’s stroke path seems to he different from the last with some golfers changing their paths from straight to breaking putts and changing again from a right-to-left breaker to a left-to-right breaker. Common sense should tell you that changing this often can’t be a good idea; my putting mantra – “simpler is better” – guarantees that the more different putting strokes you employ the worse your problems on the green.

The most practiced putting fundamental is the putter path. However my testing shows that path is actually one of the least significant factors in good putting. Yet when I ask golfers on the practice green what they are working on the most common answer is always “the path of my putter.”

The direction that the putter is moving at the moment of impact has very little influence on the starting direction of a putt: Assuming you make contact on the putter’s sweetspot the degree of influence is only about 17 percent (Figure 4.6.1). That means if the putterface is square to the intended starting line and the putter moves across that line at a 10-degree angle as it makes contact the ball will start only 1.7 degrees off-line (17 percent times 10 degrees equals 1.7 degrees).

So you can make a large error in your stroke path and see only a small error in the starting line of your putt. Another way to think of it is this: On a dead-straight five-foot putt your path could travel along a line aimed 13 inches left of the hole center and the ball would still hit the left edge (Figure 4.6.2) assuming you hit the sweetspot and everything else about your stroke was perfect.

As you will see in section 4.8 putterface angle has more effect on the line a pull starts on than does the putter path. But golfers practice putter path because

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

As 1 mentioned above l’m moving from the more to the less complex in terms of having to perform manipulations and actions to make these strokes happen. That means I’m going to finish with the method I think is the easiest. You can skip ahead if you like but 1’d suggest reading through the less desirable methods so you don’t someday find yourself doing something that you think is good but is actually hurting your chances of success.

One putting method you rarely hear about is “body putting.” As shown in Figure 3.5.1 the arms wrists and hands arc locked onto the body so the putter is swung by the rotation of the body around the spine. One reason it’s rarely mentioned is that you’ve never seen a Tour professional putt this way for any length of time and with any measure of success. I have tried it and yes putts can be made with this stroke. But that doesn’t mean you should do it.

Body putting does help eliminate the wrist collapse and forearm rotation problems so many golfers suffer from. However the body turn is so powerful it doesn’t allow golfers to develop the delicate touch for dealing with fast greens. Body putting also relies on the very thing that most golfers want to avoid on the green and that is unwanted body motion. Watch golfers particularly amateurs and you’ll see them unknowingly make all manner of body movements when they putt particularly swaying back and forth which puts them out of sync with their stroke. Because it destroys timing body motion is one of the leading causes of inconsistency and havoc in traditional putting.

The Power Stroke

A number of very fine players putt with what I call the “power stroke ” by which I mean a stroke in which the power comes from the muscles of the hands wrists or forearms. Some power-strokers use their wrist muscles hinging their wrists the way Arnold Palmer did very successfully in the early part of his career (Figure 3.5.2). Another power-stroker Tiger Woods doesn’t break his wrists but supplies power with his arm muscles (Figure 3.5.3).

Both Arnold and Tiger like to force things to happen to control their putts and make them do what they want them to do. And we all know that they both have so much talent they perform this way very well. I think however they would both putt better if they used less hit and more stroke in their putting motions. (What do I mean? Have you ever seen Arnold or Tiger blow a short putt four feet past the hole? That’s what I mean.)

No matter what provides the power there are two big drawbacks to a power stroke. First is the likelihood of a “power surge ” which can be caused by adrenaline resulting from anxiety or excitement; this significantly degrades the touch of most players under pressure. Second is the uncertainty of controlling the wrist hinge if there is one when the muscles are tight under pressure. Either way consistency usually suffers.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Bowood Park Golf Club

First of all, it’s important that you realize that your grip will affect the results that you get. However, it’s not as complicated as the other systems make it out to be. First, grab the club with your right hand so the face of it is toward the target. Keep the face pointed toward the target, while placing your left hand on the bottom of the grip or handle. At this point you should be holding your left hand out flat, so that it is touching the bottom of the grip. Position the joint where your left pinky meets your palm directly underneath the handle of the club. Keep the pinky there and place the first joint in your left forefinger directly underneath the club. Now, do not lift your fingers up, bringing the grip of the club into your palm; instead, hold the handle steady with your left fingers and wrap your palm around the top of the grip. This is an important distinction. Again, don’t wrap the fingers towards the palm, but instead wrap your palm around the top of the club. Now, you should be able to easily place your left thumb directly on top of the club. This should form a V-shape where your left thumb and left forefinger meet. This V-shape should point directly to your right shoulder when it’s complete.

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