Blyth Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Blyth Golf Club

About Blyth Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Blyth Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Blyth Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Blyth Golf Club

Developed on land where once stood a pit head and it’s entire mining community, Blyth has matured and developed into a tree-lined parkland couse with a par of 72 – but don’t be fooled by it’s gently undulating character. It’s first six holes are a test for any golfer and negotiate them without dropping too many shots and you can be set up for a good score. But beware – there are some cunning water hazards on 9,12,13 and 14 that demand a strong nerve and a sure stroke. They don’t call the 13th ‘Sinkers’ for nothing!

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

That was one of what I consider the critical “learning moments” I’ve had in golf. Looking closely at that green from ground level I decided to measure the severity of this effect on the entire course. I got up early the next morning and followed the first group while the greens were still covered with dew. This allowed me to actually see and count the individual footprints. I learned that a foursome often makes more than 500 footprints on each green it plays. Even worse these footprints were not evenly distributed: Most were within six feet of the hole because half of all putts were from less than six feet away. They created a trampled-down area between 6 feet and 6 inches away from the hole (no one was so inconsiderate as to step within 6 inches of the cup) and 360 degrees around it. I began referring to this area as the “lumpy donut” (see Figure 2.4.1).

There’s no way a golfer can know how many footprints are between his ball and the hole before a putt. That’s true even if you are in the first group to tee off when the greens are in the best possible condition to allow putts to roll straight and true. Because even then one of the men who cut the grass on the green or cut the cup into the green earlier that morning may have left one footprint dead in the path of your putt as it slows near the hole. And if this one footprint turns your putt away from the hole you’re going to get disgusted and assume it just isn’t your day (or worse think you made a had stroke). If however this footprint turns your ball into the hole you do a little dance (making more footprints!) and assume you hit a great putt. Again this is one more example of the unpredictable and statistical nature of putting. You can’t do much about it but you should be aware of it because you’ll never detect or be absolutely sure about these invisible land mines that lie in wait on the greens.

The Ramp

There was something else I noticed while collecting my lumpy-donut data. On greens where the traffic was particularly intense there was a ramp – a raised area – all around and leading up to the hole. The golfers had trampled near the cup but they were very careful not to step inside the six inches immediately around it so that area was elevated inside the center of the lumpy donut (Figure 2.4.2). These ramps I learned cause many putts that are slowing down and dying as they near the hole to be stopped short or turned away. I measured and found that if those same slow-rolling putts were hit at the same speed on a perfect surface they should have and would have fallen into the hole. So because numerous golfers before you were respectful of the hole your putt missed.

Wind

Here’s a factor that you can’t see but you can feel. Of course if the wind is blowing 50 miles an hour you might see it blow your ball off-line as it rolls to the hole. But what about a light breeze? Does it affect your puns? In Chapter 9 I’ve quantified what wind can do to a putt. It’s just one more unknowable factor that you might want to be aware of so you can play your best golf.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

4.13 The Best Way to Putt

A quick review. The easiest way to roll balls at controlled speeds on your intended line is to use a True Roller. Mechanically the simplest way to swing a putter along your Aimline is to straddle the line and use a croquet-style putting stroke.

But the best legal way to putt is to take a perfectly fit putter and aim it accurately from a square setup with your feet knees hips shoulder and eye flow-lines aligned parallel-left of your Aimline; put your eyes vertically over the line and your hands vertically under your shoulders; then stroke your putt solidly on the sweetspot with a dead-hands pure-in-line stroke keeping your putterface square to the Aimline (Figure 4.13.1). In the next few chapters you ‘ll learn that if you

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 111 make this stroke in your own body rhythm following a perfect routine and ritual sequence with good touch and feel and play the correct amount of break then you’ve got it.

This pure-in-line-square putting stroke is natural works under pressure minimizes the critical nature of timing and hall position conforms 100 percent to the USGA Rules of Golf and is fundamentally simple to do. I highly recommend it!

CHAPTER 5 Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual

5.1 Controlling the Ball

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Blyth Golf Club

Now that you have the proper grip with your left hand, we can focus on the right hand. Take your right hand and place it underneath the handle of the club. Lift up your left forefinger from underneath the club so it can move freely. Interlock your right picky with your left forefinger.

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