Blunsdon House Hotel & Golf Course

Golf Lessons at Blunsdon House Hotel & Golf Course

About Blunsdon House Hotel & Golf Course

Golf Lessons at Blunsdon House Hotel & Golf Course

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Blunsdon House Hotel & Golf Course for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Blunsdon House Hotel & Golf Course

Blunsdon House Hotel originated soon after the Bath and West Agricultural Show was held at Swindon in late 1957, when farmers Peter & Zan Clifford took in bed & breakfast customers to help out a friend. The guest house became a licensed country club in 1960, and then a fully licensed hotel in 1962. We have climbed through hotel ratings of listed, approved, one, two and three star, to become the first four star hotel in the county of Wiltshire. The Clifford family still own the hotel, Peter, Zan, son John, daughter in law Carrie are the directors and third generation Ben, Christopher & Grace all contribute to the business.

Blunsdon House Hotel & Golf Course

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

9.4 Simple Experiments Say Perhaps Yes

You probably could he pushed to agree that it is reasonable to expect golf halls rolling on smooth fast low-friction surfaces (such as a desktop) to be blown sideways by wind. Prove it to yourself by running the “desk wind test ” shown in Figure 9.4.1. Roll a golf ball across your desktop five times to get the feel of where the ball rolls on its own. Then roll it five more times blowing on the ball from the side each time as it passes your face. On at least one of the rolls you’ll hit the ball with your exhaled breath (you’ll miss above or below a few times too) and see it pushed off-line. Once you get the hang of hitting the ball with your breath you can prove to yourself that winds with against and quartering across the line of the rolling ball can have an effect too (Figure 9.4.2).

In the examples and figures above my breath wind speed was about 10 miles per hour which shows that even a relatively low-velocity wind influences the roll of the ball dramatically on a low-friction surface. So what does that mean for your putting on fast and slow greens?

Wind Lopsided Balls Dimples Rain Sleet and Snow 197

To help you understand what really happens to a ball rolling on a flat putting green surface look at Figure 9.4.3. You can see the forces that control the motion of the ball and a simple evaluation of the strength of those forces will tell you where the ball is going to go.

On a windless day a putt rolls forward with the momentum you provided by putting it. As it rolls toward the hole friction against the green surface and air resistance (which is small but does count) slows it down. On a flat green there is no force pushing the ball sideways no downhill component of gravity and no force preventing it from being pushed sideways.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Where are you aiming? Sooner or later 1 ask that question of every golfer I work with. Aim is a critical aspect of putting (more on that later) and both you and I need to know not only where you are trying to aim (where you think you are aiming) but also where you are actually aiming your putter your stance and your stroke.

Technically when I refer to aim I am referring to a direction. The direction of your aim can be at a place like the edge of the hole or at an object such as a discolored piece of grass a spike mark or anything you can see and define. What you choose to aim at can be anywhere along your Aimline from just in front of the ball to alongside or even past the hole. Your aim can be one inch one ball three balls a foot or even 10 feet outside the right or left edge of the cup or it can be anywhere inside the cup. Only after you determine how much you expect your putt to break and define somewhere or something to aim at can the direction of your aim your Aimline be visualized located or marked on the green.

The track along which your putter travels is your “putter path. ” It can move straight back and straight through in-line with your Aimline it can cut across from outside-to-in or inside-to-out (shown in Figure 4.2.1) or it can loop around your Aimline. Golfers take their putters severely or slightly inside and outside their Aimlines waver along their Aimlines and sometimes incorporate a bit of all of the above into their putting paths. I believe there are almost as many distinct putter paths as there are golfers and I’m sure I haven’t seen them all.

Face Angle

A very important consideration is the putterface angle which we define as the angle between the perpendicular to your putterface and your Aimline (left side

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 59

When your face angle is pointing left of your Aimline it is closed (again for right-handed golfers). The “open” and “closed” terminology reverses for lefthanders. You must understand and remember that your putterface angle and putter path arc completely independent of each other.

Blunsdon House Hotel & Golf Course

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Blunsdon House Hotel & Golf Course

Position the golf ball in the manner previously described, then stand straight up. Your knees are not locked, but they are close to locked. Your back is perfectly straight. Your chest should be out. It won’t feel right to have your back straight and chest protruding. It will look and feel “exaggeratedâ€