Bletchingley Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Bletchingley Golf Club

About Bletchingley Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Bletchingley Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Bletchingley Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Bletchingley Golf Club

Bletchingley Golf Club first opened for play in September 1993. We have a pleasant and friendly clubhouse, which has undergone a sizeable extension and provides magnificent facilities for its members to be proud of. The Clubhouse provides the ideal venue in which to entertain both friends and clients, where the emphasis is on service & quality.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Hold Your Finish

Greg Norman understands that he must hold his finish when putting (Figure 5.6.2). Just watch him: Whether he is putting to win a tournament or putting on a practice green he always holds his finish as he watches the ball roll. He learns a little hit about his putting his stroke and the green from every putt.

Compare this to the common golfer ‘s reaction to a putt (Figure 5.6.3). The ball is barely struck and he is reacting talking complaining letting go of the putter standing up and turning away. Before the ball has stopped rolling he has lost all feeling for the stroke that moved it and there is nothing left to correlate with the result. Not only hasn’t his putt found the hole (a safe bet) but the golfer hasn’t learned anything from it. By holding his finish and watching his putts Norman learns a lot about his putting. By looking away and complaining while the ball is still rolling most amateurs learn little to nothing about theirs. And by the way if you ever learn as much about your putting as Greg has about his you’ll probably win lots of tournaments too.

You can only practice and learn to improve putting touch in the present in the now. You must be on the green watching the ball roll to a stop while retaining the

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 125 feel of the stroke that caused that result. If you think this requires a lot of attention or is difficult to do it is not. Simply by making it a habit to hold the finish of every putting stroke and watching your putts stop you will learn a little about your touch with every putt you make for the rest of your golf career. Then as you putt on the course or on the practice green your touch will become a little bit better with every roll. All it takes is learning what size and feel of stroke make the ball do what you want it to do. And after a few thousand watched strokes and a few thousand little bits of learning the results start to add up and your putting touch begins to show dramatic improvement.

Don’t Think Repeat

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The pop stroke does have one advantage and that is it keeps the putterface angle essentially square at all times which is a good thing. However it uses the muscles of the hands and arms for power and is therefore a difficult method to use if you want to develop really good touch.

One of the more interesting putting techniques in golf history is the so-called “hook stroke” of the great South African Bobby Locke who won more than 80 tournaments worldwide between the 1930s and ’50s including four British Opens. Many golfers have told me that Locke put hook spin on his putts which made them dive into the hole. That may have been what both they and Locke thought but I’m sure it was not the case.

I’ve seen photographs of Locke from which 1 can imagine that his stroke traveled on an in-to-out path with the putterface slightly closed through impact (Fig

Methods of Putting 45 ure 3.5.5). Such a stroke motion would make one think he was trying to hook puns and he may have actually put a very small amount of initial hook spin on his longer putts (his stroke proved both very consistent and very successful – Locke’s putting prowess was legendary). But I’m sure his putts were not spinning to the left or downward when they found the hole. They rolled in just like other golfers’ putts except they may have done so more consistently than any other player of his time. (In section 4.9 you’ll learn that the surface of the green takes all the spin off a putt within the first 20 percent of its roll.)

Bobby Locke was a great putter but his putts did not hook into the hole. preparing to roll a putt.

The Cut Stroke

While there’s no such thing as hooking putts it is possible to cut across the path of one’s putts which is precisely what Chi Chi Rodriguez did while winning more than 30 tournaments in his career. Chi Chi actually putted fairly well in the early years of his career consistently cutting across the ball by swinging the putterhead outside-to-inside across the line (Figure 3.5.6). But his putting failed him later on because a cut stroke makes putting more complex than it needs to be.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Bletchingley Golf Club

First of all, it’s important that you realize that your grip will affect the results that you get. However, it’s not as complicated as the other systems make it out to be. First, grab the club with your right hand so the face of it is toward the target. Keep the face pointed toward the target, while placing your left hand on the bottom of the grip or handle. At this point you should be holding your left hand out flat, so that it is touching the bottom of the grip. Position the joint where your left pinky meets your palm directly underneath the handle of the club. Keep the pinky there and place the first joint in your left forefinger directly underneath the club. Now, do not lift your fingers up, bringing the grip of the club into your palm; instead, hold the handle steady with your left fingers and wrap your palm around the top of the grip. This is an important distinction. Again, don’t wrap the fingers towards the palm, but instead wrap your palm around the top of the club. Now, you should be able to easily place your left thumb directly on top of the club. This should form a V-shape where your left thumb and left forefinger meet. This V-shape should point directly to your right shoulder when it’s complete.

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