Blacknest Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Blacknest Golf Club

About Blacknest Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Blacknest Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Blacknest Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Blacknest Golf Club

Huntwood Golf Course opened on the 24th May 1996. Since that day the course has matured and become one of the most popular courses in Buckinghamshire. We boast a beautifully presented 18 hole golf course that is open all year round. Although we present a traditional course, we have managed to bring a modern day feel to the club. We offer a Pay & Play facility for those wishing to play recreational golf, as well as a thriving members club for those who like to play in competition. From the sweeping fairways set in the heart of the picturesque valley, to the small greens guarded by numerous bunkers, makes a good second shot a must.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 113

Once you know how much gas you need then you have to figure out how hard to step on the gas pedal and when to step on the brakes as you drive on your Thanksgiving trip (something you figure out after you are into the trip) to negotiate the stops and turns in the road along the way. This “knowing how to drive” is analogous to knowing how to feel the proper stroke in putting where you must know in your mind’s eye the required size of the swing (or hardness of the hit) as well as how it will look and feel to impart the power which will provide the proper energy and speed of roll required. So touch is knowing how long the trip is and how much power it will require and feel is knowing how to apply the power (how to drive) to get you there.

Of course good touch and feel also require a proper read of the green knowing what will happen to your putt as it rolls. Think of green-reading as having a good road map for your journey. A good map or good directions can make the trip easy but a bad map with poor directions can turn the simplest trip into a nightmare.

So you need a map enough gas and the knowledge of how hard to step on the gas pedal along the way. You need all these things in concert to have a good trip. And you need good feel touch and green-reading skills also working together to putt well. Leave one out or do one poorly and it will he the same as losing your way on your Thanksgiving trip. Feel touch and green-reading are separate skills essentially different in nature yet each needs to be developed to provide the best result. And in case I ‘ve confused you that result is to roll the ball into the hole.

5.2 Touch and Feel Are in the Mind’s Eye

The skill bases for your touch and feel (green-reading will be discussed in Chapter 7) are intermingled in your mind. They are also intermingled in that they have a combined effect on putting results. But each is a separate skill which can be learned and developed over time.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The entire path that your putt takes is the “ball track” (left side of Figure 4.1.4). It may remind you of the “action track” sometimes used on television to show how a ball has traveled. The distances between the balls on the track indicate how fast (relatively) the putt is traveling: Farther apart means it is rolling faster; closer together and it is rolling slower. A detailed ball track provides an accurate understanding of a putt’s entire motion – both where and how fast it was going – better even than the same putt recorded and played back on videotape.

The amount or size of the “break” played on a putt is a measure of the difference between the direction you aim and start the putt rolling and where you want it to go. We define the amount of break as the distance between the Aimline (up by the hole) and the nearest edge of the hole measured along a line between the two (right side of Figure 4.1.4). The actual amount the ball breaks (curves) is something different because the ball track ideally curves into the center of the hole. But golfers refuse to deal with that detail. When golfers say they are playing one inch of break what they mean is that their Aimline passes one inch outside the edge of the hole as shown in Figure 4.1.5. Technically they expect the putt to break 3¼ inches – one inch plus half the diameter of the hole (2½ inches) – but they insist on thinking and saying that they are playing one inch of break.

Golfers the world over have made a tacit agreement to think of break as measured from the edge of the hole rather than the center. Unless the putt breaks less than half the width of the hole. Then we refer to it as breaking from somewhere inside the cup such as an “inside left edge” or “right center ” to the center of the hole. Only then do we acknowledge that our target is the center of the hole.

Let’s be sure that you understand the terms I’ve defined so far. You’ve cleaned your ball on the green and replaced it in front of your mark. Standing behind your ball on the ball-hole line you realize that if you putt directly along that line it will break to the left and miss below the hole. So you move slightly downhill from the

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 57 ball-hole line and try to imagine how far uphill to the right you must start your putt if you want to make it. You select an Aimline which runs about 28 inches outside the right edge of the hole you walk to the ball set up perfectly along your new Aimline and make practice strokes until ready. You execute the perfect stroke and your ball starts exactly on your Aimline. You guessed the right amount of break (28 inches) and gave your putt the perfect speed so as it rolls it breaks gently to the left and into the center of the cup. Your ball track formed the perfect arc (Figure 4.1.6) the ball entered the exact center of the hole (centered relative to the ball track) and all is right with the world.

4.2 Stroke Definitions

Where are you aiming? Sooner or later 1 ask that question of every golfer I work with. Aim is a critical aspect of putting (more on that later) and both you and I need to know not only where you are trying to aim (where you think you are aiming) but also where you are actually aiming your putter your stance and your stroke.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Blacknest Golf Club

Wrap your right fingers lightly around the handle of the club Alternative to the interlock grip (The overlap grip)

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