Bishops Stortford Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Bishops Stortford Golf Club

About Bishops Stortford Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Bishops Stortford Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Bishops Stortford Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Bishops Stortford Golf Club

Bishop’s Stortford Golf Club is a traditional members’ club with a warm welcome, it is situated on the eastern edge of Bishop’s Stortford, with excellent access to the M11. An attractive, undulating parkland par 71 course of 6404 yards enhanced by a large variety of trees and flowering shrubs, it provides a challenging test for both average and low handicap golfers. Facilities include spacious bar areas, restaurant and conference facilities. There are also two snooker rooms and a large screen television for members’ relaxation. The excellent catering facilities range from major functions to daily meals and bar snacks and there is also a well-supported calendar of social events. The professionals shop is extensively stocked and is equipped with one of the most advanced golf simulator centres in the UK and tuition is available for golfers of all abilities.

Bishops Stortford Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Establish Your Practice Framework 245 you while a perfectly fit putter will usually only not hurt you. A perfect putter usually won’t make your stroke better it won’t make your green-reading any better and it certainly won’t knock the putts into the hole for you.

I put the odds at a thousand-to-one that a new questionably fit putter will help you putt better. Every once in a great while a golfer finds a putter with a head he can aim better or that sets him in a better position (like Lee’s hands). But even then it usually doesn’t last because the golfer doesn’t understand what happened moves on to another bad habit and starts putting poorly again. As for that magic putter? Well it must have lost its magic so back into the garage or another barrel it goes.

That’s what putter-fitting can’t do. Let’s see what it can do and what you should do about it.

Lie Angle and Shaft Length

These are the two specifications you should get fit first. Starting in a perfect setup position – eyes vertically above the Aimline hands vertically under the shoulders shoulder and forearm flow-lines parallel to the Aimline posture and back-to-hip angles comfortable – there is only one lie angle and one shaft length that will position the ball exactly at the sweetspot of the putter (Figure 11.6.3) while connecting the putterhead to your hands.

By the way the shaft can be a little long without hurting the overall balance. As long as you can move your hands down the grip you’re fine. But don’t let it get so long that it gets caught in your clothing especially in any rain gear or other weather wear. Unfortunately that’s a mistake most golfers don’t realize they’ve made until too late.

Bishops Stortford Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Just about every shot in golf except putting requires rotation of the forearms through the impact zone. But apply that same rotation to your putting stroke and you’ll produce double trouble. First your putterface will rotate from open to closed so the likelihood that it is square at the moment of impact becomes very small. Second forearm rotation supplies unwanted and unnecessary power and usually a lot of it.

But there’s yet another problem with forearm rotation: it feels natural. Even Tour professionals don’t realize they’re doing it and when I tell them to stop they usually say “What do you mean I’m not rotating my arms! ” But of course they are. And like the pros most golfers don’ t mean to do it and if you ask them don’t think they are. But they are and you probably are too. Which is too bad because forearm rotation makes putting more difficult more inconsistent and less effective.

You’ll have to wait until Chapter 13 to learn how to stop rotating your forearms. For now however make a mental note that you will stop making this destructive motion. It will be one of your challenges in improving your putting and a crucial one.

Body Power

In the previous chapter I talked about body putting something rarely seen among the pros because it’s a bad thing to do. Your body is large and the big muscles of the chest back and legs are strong particularly when compared to the small amounts of power needed to roll a ball on the fast surface of a putting green. Still many golfers put too much of their body into the stroke rotating the lower body sliding the lower body toward the hole or moving the upper body away from the hole (Figure 4.5.2). All these motions are unintentional (at least I hope so) but they still produce unwanted power and directional instability.

For example I estimate that for every inch the body moves toward the target during the putting stroke the ball moves an additional foot on the green. And rotating the lower body not only adds power it also causes the putterface to rotate from open to closed.

Putting is a game in which delicate feel and touch create exactly the right speed and break of your putts. When you’re trying to be precise body power causes nothing but trouble.

Bishops Stortford Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Bishops Stortford Golf Club

Hold the club steady with your right hand, and place left hand underneath the club as shown. The first joint of the left forefinger should be directly on the bottom of the handle, as well as the last joint of your left pinky. Once you have placed your palm on top of the club, do the same with your left thumb. Place it directly on top of the handle of the club. Next, interlock the left forefinger, and the right pinky. Nudge your right hand all the way towards the bottom of the grip. Now again, wrap the right palm all the way around the top of the grip. Don’t hold the grip of the club in your right palm. You should be able to cover up your left thumb with your right palm if you’ve done it correctly. You’ll see another V-shape being made where your right thumb and right forefinger meet. As a check, this V should be pointing directly at your right shoulder. If it doesn’t point at your right shoulder, rotate your hand on the grip so that it does. Your fingers should be giving the club most of the support it needs, NOT your palms.

Bishops Stortford Golf Club