Birchwood Park Golf Centre

Golf Lessons at Birchwood Park Golf Centre

About Birchwood Park Golf Centre

Golf Lessons at Birchwood Park Golf Centre

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Birchwood Park Golf Centre for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Birchwood Park Golf Centre

Birchwood Park Golf Centre offers the perfect blend of facilities, location and exceptional service. Situated on the picturesque outskirts of Wilmington, near Dartford, the Centre offers two challenging golf courses, extensive bar and catering facilities, floodlit driving range and golf academy, a well stocked pro’s shop and a first class private function suite.

Birchwood Park Golf Centre

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

I’ d done all the research. I’d known for years that golfers were under-reading the true break in putts. I’d been pleading begging my students to look at their putts and watch how much they broke to learn they needed to play three times as much break as they used to think they were playing. I promised that if they did they could stop their subconscious compensations and they would make more putts. But I’d been asking them the whole time to putt along a line they had no chance to see because it is invisible to them.

It was a day in the fall of 1999. As I watched putts roll over and over through our hole bridge which marks the hole for putts without affecting their roll as shown in Figure 7.7.4 (on left) on a perfect ball track I realized that no ball ever

Green-Reading the 15th Building Block 157 came close to the true break point. At that moment I saw (in my mind’s eye) the true break and the visible break for the first time at the same time. When I saw both breaks simultaneously I was almost paralyzed. I realized that I ‘d never truly understood how balls curve as they break along their tracks. I had always imagined that they moved rapidly after first being struck rolling along the line they started on for a good distance up to their apex before curving quickly down to the cup as they lost speed toward the end of the roll (Figure 7.7.4 right). But that is clearly not the case. In fact if you look again at the real ball track on this 9-foot putt and compare it to my previously imagined ball path you can see how bad my imagination had been. Can you see why I (and perhaps you) thought these putts broke less? If you are an apex putter (you imagine and aim at an apex) and you look up and see the ball at what you assume is its apex (but is really only its visible break) rolling down into the hole the next time you see a putt on a slope like this you’ll under-read it for sure.

I immediately measured and learned that the visible break of most putts is only about a third of the true break. A third! I finally understood why my students couldn’t see the true break even when I was beating on them to look for it. It’s hard to sec something that never appears before you (the true-break Aimline) especially when something that looks so real (your ball rolling on the visible-break ball track) is right in front of you. So the eyesight of the 1 500 golfers I tested was not so bad after all. The amateurs had seen most of the visible break and the Tour pros had seen all of it. The problem was they thought the visible-break apex was where they had aimed and stroked their putts. They were totally unaware of their subconscious compensations to pull or push their starting lines up near the true-break Aimline in order to get their putts to roll there!

7.8 Gut-Feel Putting

You now should understand why most golfers under-read break. The only break they ever sec is the visible break and they assume the visible-break apex is the line they started their putt on. They never realize that their subconscious is fight ing compensating to get their putts high enough to have a chance to find the hole

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

And those arc the same reasons I strongly discourage a narrow stance for putting. A narrow stance makes it too easy for the golfer to move and rotate the lower body. Furthermore a narrow stance isn’t stable enough to resist being pushed around in the wind.

To establish a stable base for your stroke take a stance width that is at least as wide as your shoulders (Figure 4.10.13) as measured from the centerline of your

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 103 shoes to the center of each shoulder. Even wider stances are okay but narrower is not.

If stability continues to be a problem you might borrow something from Arnold Palmer who established a very solid base for his putting stroke by standing knock-kneed (Figure 4.10.14). With his knees turned in Arnold absolutely could not move his lower body. However most golfers I suggest this to seem embarrassed to use it which is too had because it works.

104 The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics

Opening or closing your stance by moving your feet off the flow-line is accept able but not recommended. Because your stance can affect your shoulder align ment and the line of your shoulders is vital to good putting I normally recom mend setting the feet square. Of course it is possible to move your feet open or closed without moving your shoulders. Just be sure your shoulder flow-line re mains parallel-left to your Aimline.

My measurements also show that many of the world’s best putters create a stable lower body by placing slightly more than half – 55 to 60 percent – of their weight on their forward foot.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Birchwood Park Golf Centre

Now that you have the proper grip with your left hand, we can focus on the right hand. Wrap your right fingers lightly around the handle of the club as shown to the left.

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