Billingbear Park Golf Course

Golf Lessons at Billingbear Park Golf Course

About Billingbear Park Golf Course

Golf Lessons at Billingbear Park Golf Course

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Billingbear Park Golf Course for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Billingbear Park Golf Course

Our 18-hole ‘pay and play’ golf course complex is designed to be enjoyed by beginners and experienced players alike. Whether as an experienced golfer you want to play The Old Course, for 9 or 18 holes of beautiful parkland golf, or sharpen up your short game on The New Course, a stunning 9-hole Par-3 course featuring two holes where your tee shot from the back tees are played entirely over water, Billingbear Park has a lot to offer. Many believe we have one of the best pay&play golf courses in Berkshire.As a beginner or if you’re a golfer teaching your family the game, then the Par-3 course really comes into its own with a choice of tees on many holes that make it even more accessible to the players who are learning the game. Our friendly staff will look after you throughout your visit and, unusually for a pay&play course, there is a really great club-like atmosphere at Billingbear Park. You can even call us from the 9th tee to order drinks and meals for the whole group to enjoy in our comfortable and welcoming new clubhouse!

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Shouldn’t you choose the tools that will help you shoot the lowest scores?

If you putt better with a long putter on short putts then you definitely should carry one for handling short putts (remember short putts – under 6 feet – com prise one-half of all putts). If at the same time you lag your long putts closer to the hole with a short putter then carry one of those too. The USGA is very fair in this regard: They say you can’t carry more than 14 clubs but they don’t specify which 14 they must be. So if for some bizarre reason you found you could make more 10- to 15-foot putts with a six-inch-long putter then I would recommend you carry one of those as well. 1 kid you not. If you want to carry two putters more power to you. Quite a few students leave our Scoring Game Schools carrying two putters and four wedges and play the best golf of their lives (Figure 11.6.6).

But be sure to test for distance efficiency and then commit to a particular putter for putts of a particular length before you play. You don’t want to be deciding on the course which putter to use.

Shaft Axis

An often overlooked component of a putter’s construction is where the shaft con nects to the head. It’s important because it helps determine the axis around which the putterhead rotates which can help minimize head rotation on mis-hit putts.

As discussed in section 4.9 it ‘s important to make consistent contact on or as near as possible to the sweetspot. (Review that section if you don’t remember how impact patterns correlate with handicaps.) Golfers who tend to mis-hit toward the

Billingbear Park Golf Course

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The Block Stroke Here’s a method that sounds almost ridiculous: Aim the putterface a foot to the left of your target on a straight putt then block the ball toward the hole. That’s what Lee Trevino has done throughout his career (Figure 3.5.8).

Methods of Putting 47 “block-strokes” better than Lee Trevino.

Every part of Lee’s game is built on aiming to the left then blocking his swing through impact so it’s little surprise he does this when putting too. In my opinion Trevino is another great player who achieved greatness in spite of his putting not because of it. And he agrees: Lee told me that if he had putted as well as Jack Nicklaus you might never have heard of the Golden Bear.

I believe him. He has always been a great ball-striker (the best I ever measured) and he putted reasonably well but never great. He is a very talented player who did well with a somewhat complex putting stroke. But he would have putted better and won more with a better (which to me means simpler) putting stroke.

Next on my list of strokes (still moving toward simplicity) is the “blend” stroke a combination of the power stroke and a pure pendulum stroke usually employing a slight wrist hinge. A number of fine players putt this way including Brad Faxon Lee Janzen D. A. Weibring and Ben Crenshaw (Figure 3.5.9). Every one of these players is a wonderful putter and every one uses a predominantly pendulum motion with just a little bit of power provided by the hand muscles.

The small amount of wrist hinge each employs is done down the line so it doesn’t cause directional difficulty. When I’ve asked them about this motion they all say that their best putting days come when the stroke is more pendulum and less wrist. More proof that simplicity is the key ingredient in good putting.

The “right-hand push ” or “push stroke ” used by Jack Nicklaus has been a repeatable reliable performer for a long time. A friend once told me that Jack really wasn’t that good a player: He was just on a 30-year hot streak! Indeed Jack has putted consistently well throughout most of his career. Even today Jack’s putting remains unshakable perhaps the strongest part of his game.

Billingbear Park Golf Course

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Billingbear Park Golf Course

Now, you should be standing up straight, with your chest out, and your shoulders back. Your arms should be out in front of you, your elbows locked, and your wrists level with the height of your waist, while holding the club parallel to the ground. Next, bend over AT THE HIPS until the club touches the ground. Move towards or away from the ball according to where the club touches the ground. After some practice, you will be able to judge the distance well enough so that you don’t have to move around to get into position. Keep your chest out and straight while bending over at the hips. It is impossible to overstate the importance of this. You should not be bending with the back at all to reach down to the ball; you should be bending AT THE HIPS. This is one of the most common mistakes made by amateur golfers. If you look at any professional golfer on television, they will ALWAYS have a straight back, and they will ALWAYS bend at the waist to get to the ball. You will feel like your “seat” is protruding backwards more than usual. That is what we want here. Also, it’s okay if the toe of your club is not flush with the ground. It’s should be that way, especially for the long irons.

Billingbear Park Golf Course