Billingbear Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Billingbear Park Golf Club

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Golf Lessons at Billingbear Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Billingbear Park Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Billingbear Park Golf Club

Whether as an experienced golfer you want to play The Old Course, for 9 or 18 holes of beautiful parkland golf, or sharpen up your short game on The New Course, a stunning 9-hole Par-3 course featuring two holes where your tee shot from the back tees are played entirely over water, Billingbear Park has a lot to offer. Many believe we have one of the best pay&play golf courses in Berkshire.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Finally “Flow good will your putting be in the future?” That depends on your ability to learn the mechanics of a better putting stroke your ability to learn better putting feel and touch your ability to learn to read greens better and your ability to produce the right stroke at the right time. Depending on your lifestyle your determination and intensity your focus your self-discipline and practice habits and your ability to learn only you can provide this answer.

For most golfers to improve their scores it is often easier to reduce their number of three-putts than it is to increase their number of one-putts. This is generally true for golfers with handicaps greater than 20 although it is even true for some very fine lower-handicap players. As you can see in Figure 2.9.1 the length of the most frequent first putt on greens hit from outside 60 yards is 38 feet. (This distance varies a little with the handicap of the players measured but obviously there are many more long first putts than short ones.) This figure also shows that the most frequent first putt to follow shots hit from inside 60 yards is an 18-footer. If you combine these two curves and add in all the second and third putts that become necessary after the first putt is missed you can see a typical value for the number of putts of each length golfers face per round over a season of golf (Figure 2.9.2).

Now look at the conversion curve for this group of 15- to 25-handicap golfers (Figure 2.9.3) and the frequency with which they three-putt versus the putt distance (Figure 2.9.4). By comparing these data you can see the importance of making short putts as well as learning that you can save several strokes per round by eliminating three-putts from outside 30 feet. This means that you shouldn’t practice only short putts; the long ones are also important. And you must stop three-putting those long ones if you want to be a good putter.

For those not familiar with “lag putting ” some explanations:

• To lag a putt is to minimize thoughts of holing it instead concentrating on stopping the ball as close to the proper distance and as close to the hole as possible thus minimizing the possibility of three-putting (which is first priority).

Problems on the Greens 31

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The basic idea is to keep your conscious mind busy seeing your perfect stroke during your practice swings as a way to build your confidence and form a clear picture in your mind’s eye. Once you see and feel how you want to stroke your putt the trick becomes simply keeping your conscious mind busy and out of the way (for example thinking about your preshot ritual) so your subconscious can do its thing. Our procedure for developing this skill and our recommended drills and practice techniques to ingrain it are detailed in Chapters 11 and 13.

4.13 The Best Way to Putt

A quick review. The easiest way to roll balls at controlled speeds on your intended line is to use a True Roller. Mechanically the simplest way to swing a putter along your Aimline is to straddle the line and use a croquet-style putting stroke.

But the best legal way to putt is to take a perfectly fit putter and aim it accurately from a square setup with your feet knees hips shoulder and eye flow-lines aligned parallel-left of your Aimline; put your eyes vertically over the line and your hands vertically under your shoulders; then stroke your putt solidly on the sweetspot with a dead-hands pure-in-line stroke keeping your putterface square to the Aimline (Figure 4.13.1). In the next few chapters you ‘ll learn that if you

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 111 make this stroke in your own body rhythm following a perfect routine and ritual sequence with good touch and feel and play the correct amount of break then you’ve got it.

This pure-in-line-square putting stroke is natural works under pressure minimizes the critical nature of timing and hall position conforms 100 percent to the USGA Rules of Golf and is fundamentally simple to do. I highly recommend it!

CHAPTER 5 Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Billingbear Park Golf Club

Please start with the three pictures below. Understand that the point of these pictures is to get your arms and chest connected. You should understand the feeling of “being connected” before you try to incorporate this critical step into your golf swing. If you hold the club straight out in front of you, there will be a triangle formed between your arms and chest. Just focus on keeping the triangle between your arms and chest fixed. Just move your arms with your chest. When your chest stops rotating, your arms also stop. Please see the three pictures below and try it out. Turn to your right, then back around to your left, keeping the triangle between your arms and chest constant at all times.

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