Betchworth Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Betchworth Park Golf Club

About Betchworth Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Betchworth Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Betchworth Park Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Betchworth Park Golf Club

Betchworth Park Golf Club is situated on the A25 between Dorking and Reigate and just 3/4 mile from the A25/A24 interchange. About 10 minutes from either junctions 8 or 9 on the M25, access is quick and easy, making it ideal for corporate and society days.

Betchworth Park Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

This technique produced the consistently best putting I’ve ever seen and it is legal. But I’m certain that if someone switches to this style and starts winning with it the USGA probably will ban it.

One of the tenets of the USGA the ruling body of golf is to protect and maintain the integrity of the game in part by preserving its challenge and difficulty. I support this noble purpose and think most golfers feel the same way. If we lost the challenge in the game it wouldn’t be nearly so much fun. Having said that we all want to make our own putting strokes simpler so we can hole more putts score better and enjoy the game to its fullest.

In keeping with their tradition of maintaining the game’s challenge the USGA would prefer that golfers putt in what they describe as the “traditional style.” While this technique is not as simple or easy as the methods described above it’s not necessarily all that difficult either. Lots of putts have been and will be made the USGA way.

Up to this point I have been going from the easiest to more difficult ways to putt. Now I have to reverse that. In discussing the following ways to putt all of which conform to the Rules I will begin with the most difficult and work down to what I perceive to be the easiest way to putt.

The USGA would be happiest if every golfer would putt like Bobby Jones (Figure 3.4.1) used to putt and would use a putter similar to Jones’s old “Calamity Jane.” Jones putted standing perpendicular to the intended putting line and made what appeared to be a miniature golf swing. While this sounds like it might make putting easy being like all the other swings in golf in reality it makes putting quite a bit more difficult.

If the putting stroke is a miniature chip shot which is a miniature 5-iron swing which is a miniature driver swing it makes down-the-line vision difficult involves a slight rotation of the body and encourages rotation of the forearms. This also encourages rotation of the putterface provides far more power than is needed and brings to bear critical timing requirements all of which make putting so difficult and traumatic to so many golfers.

Betchworth Park Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

It is a fact proven by testing that the better you aim the better you putt. That’s why I say aim is the first fundamental of putting stroke mechanics. Most golfers aim very poorly which is significant because aim can have a direct impact on all the other fundamentals: If you aim poorly something else in your stroke must compensate to correct for the error.

Aim Is Learned

Aiming is easy. Everybody aims. It is aiming precisely where you want to aim that is more elusive. The fact that most golfers do a poor job of aiming is not surprising because there’s no feedback on a putting green to teach golfers how to aim properly. In the absence of feedback golfers use two inputs to guide their attempts to aim: First they use their previous putting results (what I call reaction aiming) and second they use the look of their putter relative to their Aimline (what I call position aiming). Further explanations are in order.

Reaction Aiming

The way most golfers aim is to consider past results and then align themselves and their putter to correct for stroke faults and produce the results they want. For example you miss a putt to the left and think “I pulled it ” or maybe “I aimed too far to the left.” Miss several putts left and you think “I must be aiming too far to the left.” So what do you do? You aim to the right. Pretty soon and without realizing you’ve learned to aim consistently to the right as a way of compensating for a stroke that tends to pull to the left.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 65

Data taken in my Scoring Game Schools show conclusively that reaction aiming is a learned skill that most golfers develop as a way to compensate for their putting stroke deficiencies. Players who block their strokes to the right of their Aimline learn to aim to the left of the Aimline. Players who pull their putts to the left learn to aim to the right.

Betchworth Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Betchworth Park Golf Club

First of all, it’s important that you realize that your grip will affect the results that you get. However, it’s not as complicated as the other systems make it out to be. First, grab the club with your right hand so the face of it is toward the target. Keep the face pointed toward the target, while placing your left hand on the bottom of the grip or handle. At this point you should be holding your left hand out flat, so that it is touching the bottom of the grip. Position the joint where your left pinky meets your palm directly underneath the handle of the club. Keep the pinky there and place the first joint in your left forefinger directly underneath the club. Now, do not lift your fingers up, bringing the grip of the club into your palm; instead, hold the handle steady with your left fingers and wrap your palm around the top of the grip. This is an important distinction. Again, don’t wrap the fingers towards the palm, but instead wrap your palm around the top of the club. Now, you should be able to easily place your left thumb directly on top of the club. This should form a V-shape where your left thumb and left forefinger meet. This V-shape should point directly to your right shoulder when it’s complete.

Betchworth Park Golf Club