Bearsted Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Bearsted Golf Club

About Bearsted Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Bearsted Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Bearsted Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Bearsted Golf Club

Bearsted Golf Club, established in 1895, is a members’ club set in over 200 acres of delightful rolling countryside in the shadow of the North Downs. Situated on the outskirts of Maidstone less than 2 miles from either Junction 7 or 8 off the M20 making it accessible from a wide area.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Croquet-Style

Next on the “easiness” scale (which means it’s a little more difficult than the techniques above) is standing so you face the putting line and putt croquet-style between your legs. Yes this really has been used. Bob Duden and Bob Shave Jr. two PGA Tour pros who had been struggling with their putting used this technique back in the 1960s. I’ve never been sure whether the USGA banned this method because it was too easy too nontraditional or it just looked bad when viewed from behind. It certainly made putting easier because it gave the golfer the best view of the line before the putt and a clear view of what the ball was doing immediately after it started to roll.

Both of these views provide critically important feedback that golfers generally miss when putting in the conventional style (that is standing to the side of the line). Croquet-style putting has other benefits: It removes all rotational motion of the forearms (which opens and closes the putterface during conventional putting) it forces the wrists to remain solid (no breakdown) and it creates the perfect in-line stroke path straight down the intended putting line.

Croquet putting is so easy that it was used by no less a legend than Sam Snead in the mid-1960s (when he was in his mid-fifties) to counter a case of the yips. Snead actually putted this way (Figure 3.3.1) – with one foot on either side of the target line – during the 1966 PGA Championship where he finished tied for sixth. Perhaps it was seeing the great Samuel Jackson Snead putt from the wrong direction or perhaps it was deemed to reduce the skill required to play the game – in any case croquet-style putting was quickly outlawed by golf’s powers that be.

So Sam modified the method slightly changing to “sidesaddle” (Figure 3.3.2)

Methods of Putting 39 doing everything as much as he could the same except bringing both feet to the same side of the target line. Snead continued to putt this way until the end of his competitive career and his creation is I believe the next-easiest way to putt.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The True Roller is the easiest way to putt because it is as simple as starting the ball on the right line (in the right direction) and at the right speed. But that doesn’t mean it is easy. I know because I use it all the time in my research to determine the right speed and the right line and it can take me many tries to find the perfect release point and direction. But once I’ve got them I can roll the same putt exactly the same way over and over and over again. And ultimately that’s what you want your putting stroke to do. So the True Roller is as close to the ideal as I’ve found.

Shooting Pool

Not quite as easy as the ‘true Roller but fairly close is rolling the ball as if you are shooting pool. In Figure 3.2.2 I ‘m demonstrating this technique on a practice putting green. l’ve actually putted like this a number of times on a number of dif ferent greens and grass types because it proved to me just how important speed is to good putting. When “pool putting ” starting the ball on the chosen line is sim ple but it doesn’t help you choose the line and giving the ball the proper speed is just as difficult as it is when standing up and using your putter. Again this is not a method I think the USGA should allow. I’m merely explaining that it’s not nearly as easy as you might expect it to be. (If you don ‘t believe me get a pool cue and try using it on some breaking putts on your practice green.) Just as with the True

Roller you have to find the right speed if you hope to make anything.

Both of these methods are easier than other types of putting because they remove or at least reduce the difficulty of starting the ball on the desired line. But the pool method for sure (and to a certain extent the True Roller) is just as difficult as most other methods in transferring the correct speed to the ball.

This is a point worth repeating because most golfers don’t think enough about the speed of their putts. Rather they focus on line. If you are a “line” putter try putting with a pool cue or a True Roller and I promise you’ll learn to appreciate the importance of speed in making putts.

3.3 It Gets More Difficult

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Bearsted Golf Club

Notice that the left elbow is still locked at this point. The elbow is just crossing the imaginary line that you have created between your eyes and your belly button. Remember, try to stop your elbow at this point. This is the point where your wrists will start to flip through the ball.Also notice the angle between the left arm and the club shaft is almost the same as it was at setup.

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