Bawburgh Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Bawburgh Golf Club

About Bawburgh Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Bawburgh Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Bawburgh Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Bawburgh Golf Club

Set in over 120 acres of rolling Norfolk countryside, Glen Lodge, now home to the Bawburgh Golf Club offers the ideal venue for both social and golfing events. The always interesting and often demanding golf course was established in the early seventies, whilst the Scandinavian style Glen Lodge overlooking the eighteenth green was added in the mid nineties. Along with the golf driving range and golf academy you need look no further when searching Norfolk for a suitable venue for all.

Bawburgh Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Let me say it again: By under-reading putts you are requiring your subconscious to compensate by a different amount on every putt. That means your body must make a different stroke on every putt on every green. And there is no way you (or any golfer) can learn to properly execute a different stroke with different compensations on every putt nearly as well as you can learn to groove and repeat one stroke (one with absolutely no compensations) for all of those putts.

Remember? Simpler is better. And simpler tends to be the stroke with the fewest compensations.

7.5 It’s Hard to Believe

Golfers find all of this hard to believe. (I don’t blame you. I also found it hard to believe until 1 proved it scientifically over and over.) Golfers think that if they read a five-inch break and then make the putt the five-inch break is justified. They say ” See I played five inches and it was perfect.”They don’t recognize – and they don’t want to recognize – that although they read five inches of break they set up 12 inches to the left of the hole pulled the ball another four inches to the left and the ball broke 16 inches into the cup.

In my Scoring Game Schools having proven to our students that they are significantly under-reading we measure the true break accurately by rolling putts at the optimum putting speed with a True Roller (Figure 7.5.1). With the True Roller evidence they can see and begin to understand how much true break there is. Then we mark the true-break Aimline and ask the students to actually putt along that line and try to make the putt. What happens? They usually miss high.

The read was perfect; we marked the correct Aimline. How could the students miss high? Blame the subconscious. The player’s subconscious doesn’t trust this new read so it sticks with its habit of pulling or pushing to a spot higher than whatever the player thinks is the proper line. Now our students having missed several putts on the high side say “Sec? I knew that was too much break.” They revert to their old green-reading ways continue to under-read the break and continue to miss 90 percent of their pulls below the hole.

Bawburgh Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Technically the speed of a putt can be described and measured in quantitative terms as the velocity of motion (in units of inches or feet per second) in a given direction and the decay or decrease of velocity (the velocity profile) as the ball rolls to a stop. However since most golfers don’t think in technical terms on or off the course the actual velocity of a putt at any instant is neither very meaningful nor useful. As a result golfers talk about the speed of their putts as being too fast too slow or just about right as they approach the hole.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 61

But if you want to learn more about controlling your putting speed and making more putts you need to know more about speed than that. In fact you need to know how the rolling speed of your putts compares to their perfect or optimum speed around the hole. The speed of a putt depends on its length how fast it started where it is along its ball track how fast the green surface is and the slope (up down or sidehill) it is rolling on. For every putt there is an optimum speed that will optimize the percentage of putts that would both hit and stay in the hole. Therefore in this book as in my Scoring Game Schools we refer to a putt’s speed (while imagining its ball track) as how it relates to the optimum speed it should or could be rolling. For example as you can see in Figure 4.3.1 the left putt’s speed was too much as compared to the right putt’s speed which was virtually perfect. A detailed discussion of putting speed and optimum-speed ball tracks is in Chapter 7.

Green Speed

The speed of the surface of the green or green speed affects a ball’s roll in speed direction and amount of break. I ‘m sure you have heard greens referred to as “fast ” “slow ” “quick ” “slick ” or “sticky.” Technically the speed of the green is determined by the frictional characteristics of the surface of the green which is controlled primarily by the length type density and moisture content of the grass (more on this in Chapter 7). Golf course superintendents traditionally measure the speed characteristics of greens using a device called the Stimpmeter. much speed (left) and perfect speed (right) for two putts rolled on the same starting line.

The Stimpmeter developed years ago by a man named Edward Stimpson is a crude yet simple way to measure how far a ball will roll on a flat portion of a green when it is given a standard starting speed. The USGA-approved version of a

Stimpmeter is a solid straight piece of aluminum extruded at a 30-degree angle with an indentation near the top and a beveled bottom (Figure 4.3.2). The beveled bottom allows the Stimpmeter to sit low to the green surface and reduce the bounce of a ball rolling down the channel when it hits the green.

Bawburgh Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Bawburgh Golf Club

The right elbow should remain locked to your right side throughout the backswing. As you can see, the left arm is still locked as well.This step is included for many reasons. First, it helps you swing around your spine and promotes a correct shoulder turn. It’s really hard to move your body horizontally, while keeping your right elbow locked to your side at the same time. Secondly, it prevents the “flying elbow.” The flying elbow produces everything from a slice to a wicked hook, depending on what you do with your hands in conjunction with it. So, keeping your elbow in contact with your side will help tremendously in assuring that you swing around your body, every single time. Third, it’s a power-producing move because it will put you in a position to easily flip your hands through the ball. Fourth, keeping your right elbow locked to your side will give you a great point of reference. It keeps your swing plane correct, and is a great indicator of when to stop the back swing. Finally, it helps you to “stay connected” throughout the swing. If you have your right elbow locked at your side, it will be hard to swing your arms without rotating your shoulders and visa versa.

Bawburgh Golf Club