Aylesbury Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Aylesbury Park Golf Club

About Aylesbury Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Aylesbury Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Aylesbury Park Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Aylesbury Park Golf Club

Established in 1995, the course is a Martin Hawtree design. It combines parkland and inland links holes which are complimented by superb USGA specification greens. The club is committed to providing ‘Golf above all else’ for Members and visitors alike. You can enjoy your game safe in the knowledge that ‘shot for shot’ you are getting great value for money.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

You probably could he pushed to agree that it is reasonable to expect golf halls rolling on smooth fast low-friction surfaces (such as a desktop) to be blown sideways by wind. Prove it to yourself by running the “desk wind test ” shown in Figure 9.4.1. Roll a golf ball across your desktop five times to get the feel of where the ball rolls on its own. Then roll it five more times blowing on the ball from the side each time as it passes your face. On at least one of the rolls you’ll hit the ball with your exhaled breath (you’ll miss above or below a few times too) and see it pushed off-line. Once you get the hang of hitting the ball with your breath you can prove to yourself that winds with against and quartering across the line of the rolling ball can have an effect too (Figure 9.4.2).

In the examples and figures above my breath wind speed was about 10 miles per hour which shows that even a relatively low-velocity wind influences the roll of the ball dramatically on a low-friction surface. So what does that mean for your putting on fast and slow greens?

Wind Lopsided Balls Dimples Rain Sleet and Snow 197

To help you understand what really happens to a ball rolling on a flat putting green surface look at Figure 9.4.3. You can see the forces that control the motion of the ball and a simple evaluation of the strength of those forces will tell you where the ball is going to go.

On a windless day a putt rolls forward with the momentum you provided by putting it. As it rolls toward the hole friction against the green surface and air resistance (which is small but does count) slows it down. On a flat green there is no force pushing the ball sideways no downhill component of gravity and no force preventing it from being pushed sideways.

Now look at what happens in the wind (Figure 9.4.4). The ball is rolling toward you (out of the page); there is a side-wind force but no force in opposition except the very small force of rolling friction. This explains why wind can significantly affect your putting results without you even realizing it.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

4.3 Defining Speed

Putt Speed

The velocity with which a ball moves along the green can be referred to in several ways. Some golfers refer to this as the rolling speed or speed of the putt. Some golfers talk about the pace of a putt while others talk about how fast a putt is moving. It would be nice if we all could mean and understand the same thing when referring to speed.

Technically the speed of a putt can be described and measured in quantitative terms as the velocity of motion (in units of inches or feet per second) in a given direction and the decay or decrease of velocity (the velocity profile) as the ball rolls to a stop. However since most golfers don’t think in technical terms on or off the course the actual velocity of a putt at any instant is neither very meaningful nor useful. As a result golfers talk about the speed of their putts as being too fast too slow or just about right as they approach the hole.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 61

But if you want to learn more about controlling your putting speed and making more putts you need to know more about speed than that. In fact you need to know how the rolling speed of your putts compares to their perfect or optimum speed around the hole. The speed of a putt depends on its length how fast it started where it is along its ball track how fast the green surface is and the slope (up down or sidehill) it is rolling on. For every putt there is an optimum speed that will optimize the percentage of putts that would both hit and stay in the hole. Therefore in this book as in my Scoring Game Schools we refer to a putt’s speed (while imagining its ball track) as how it relates to the optimum speed it should or could be rolling. For example as you can see in Figure 4.3.1 the left putt’s speed was too much as compared to the right putt’s speed which was virtually perfect. A detailed discussion of putting speed and optimum-speed ball tracks is in Chapter 7.

Green Speed

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Aylesbury Park Golf Club

Hold the club steady with your right hand, and place left hand underneath the club as shown. The first joint of the left forefinger should be directly on the bottom of the handle, as well as the last joint of your left pinky. Once you have placed your palm on top of the club, do the same with your left thumb. Place it directly on top of the handle of the club. Next, interlock the left forefinger, and the right pinky. Nudge your right hand all the way towards the bottom of the grip. Now again, wrap the right palm all the way around the top of the grip. Don’t hold the grip of the club in your right palm. You should be able to cover up your left thumb with your right palm if you’ve done it correctly. You’ll see another V-shape being made where your right thumb and right forefinger meet. As a check, this V should be pointing directly at your right shoulder. If it doesn’t point at your right shoulder, rotate your hand on the grip so that it does. Your fingers should be giving the club most of the support it needs, NOT your palms.

Aylesbury Park Golf Club