Austin Lodge Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Austin Lodge Golf Club

About Austin Lodge Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Austin Lodge Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Austin Lodge Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Austin Lodge Golf Club

Welcome to Pentland Golf incorporating Austin Lodge (Eynsford), Boughton Golf Club (near Canterbury), Etchinghill (Folkestone) and The Ridge (Maidstone). Feel free to explore these courses in our online guide, check out the extensive facilities we have to offer and then why not book a society day and play in the relaxed and beautiful surroundings of rural Kent. Membership is available at all four venues at competitive rates. We hope you enjoy your visit and see you soon at one of our clubs.

Austin Lodge Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

A Dead-Hands Advantage

Notice the backswing lengths I use to hit putts compared to the hit strokes measured for amateurs in Figure 5.3.3 (page 118). As you can see there are substantially larger differences in the lengths of my backstrokes using the dead-hands action. This means that there is more room for adjustments when producing putts of different lengths with this stroke because the roll is a pure product of my backstroke length and not any hard-to-regulate “hit instinct” of the muscles. You know that if you take the putter hack so far it will produce the same-distance putt (assuming you make the same stroke time and again); take it back a little longer and the putt will roll a little farther. This also means assuming you put in the same amount of practice time for both strokes that you’ll develop better feel and distance control using the dead-hands stroke than using the hit stroke. And with the dead-hands stroke what you practice is what you do under pressure with no deviation.

The final advantage of the dead-hands stroke is that you can see it evaluate it and get comfortable with it before you use it. If during your practice strokes your mind’s eye sees the proper-length stroke required for the putt at hand then simply repeating that stroke on the real ball will create your best possible putt. No matter how much adrenaline is flowing and no matter how strong your hand and wrist muscles are if under pressure you can make a pure pendulum stroke with dead hands it will be the length of your swing that controls your putting speed not your level of excitement.

5.5 Putt in Your Personal Rhythm

The power in a golfer’s hit stroke is the product of the speed timing and muscle strength (adrenaline-aided or not) of the golfer. So what produces the power of a dead-hands stroke? It’s simply the length and rhythm of the stroke. So putting this

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 121 way becomes easier. Not easy mind you but easier. In this regard putting is similar to the rest of golf. If you swing in a rhythm consistent with the way you naturally move your body then your consistency becomes a function of your talent and technique which is how it should be. This means putting with a rhythm consistent with your personality body size weight and walking pace. All athletic motions become more consistent and repeatable when performed to a consistent rhythm. This doesn’t mean you should swing the putter at a speed that exactly matches your walking pace. But fast walkers generally should have faster putting stroke paces than slow walkers. I’ll explain more about your best putting rhythm in section 6.5. Until then accept that you must putt “within yourself;’ or at your own body rhythm to putt your best.

Austin Lodge Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Ball Position

Any putting stroke that swings in an arc suspended from somewhere around your sternum (or some other spot between your shoulders) will have a bottom to its arc a low point a place where the sole of the club is closest to the ground. I have found that the best place to position the ball in your stance is approximately two inches ahead of this bottom point. At this spot you have the best chance of striking the ball on an ever-so-slight upward arc as your putter comes up from its lowest point (Figure 4.10.1). Striking the ball slightly on the upswing gets putts rolling on top of the grass without lofting them too high which produces bounce or hitting them down into the surface of the green so they squirt off to the right or left.

Of course where your putter contacts the ball also depends on the effective loft of the putterface at the moment of impact. In Figure 4.10.2 the center ball is being struck slightly on the upswing by a putter with a small amount of loft so it starts on top of the grass with almost no spin. This is the ideal situation. The other

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 95 balls in this illustration also are struck at the same point in the stroke but are launched upward or down and receive more spin because there is more or less loft on the putterface. Since true overspin backspin and bouncing do nothing but make putts roll less consistently and spin effects are long gone before the ball reaches the hole there is no reason to try for anything other than rolling the ball on top of the grass with minimum spin.

Again there is one exception to this and again as mentioned earlier with respect to the sweetspot’s two dimensions it is when the greens are very bumpy and soft. In these conditions I sometimes recommend that players use a more lofted putter move the ball slightly forward in their stance (increasing the effective loft at impact by catching the putt more on the upstroke) or both. You can see this every year at the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am which is held in late winter. The greens are always soft and bumpy due to rain and the large field of amateurs and pros filling three courses every day. By the time our team gets to Pebble for the third round of the tournament the footprints are really bad.

Despite these conditions using slightly more loft might help explain why my man Jack Lemmon (the “human hinge”) always putts so well in that tournament (Figure 4.10.3). (Peter Jacobsen eat your heart out!)

The angle between your back and your hips should be great enough to provide room for your arms to swing with your hands vertically below your shoulders but small enough to let you comfortably practice putting at least 10 or 15 minutes at a time (Figure 4.10.4 middle photograph). Your knees should be slightly flexed enough to give you stability on windy days without making you feel crouched or uncomfortable.

Austin Lodge Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Austin Lodge Golf Club

The right elbow should remain locked to your right side throughout the backswing. As you can see, the left arm is still locked as well.This step is included for many reasons. First, it helps you swing around your spine and promotes a correct shoulder turn. It’s really hard to move your body horizontally, while keeping your right elbow locked to your side at the same time. Secondly, it prevents the “flying elbow.” The flying elbow produces everything from a slice to a wicked hook, depending on what you do with your hands in conjunction with it. So, keeping your elbow in contact with your side will help tremendously in assuring that you swing around your body, every single time. Third, it’s a power-producing move because it will put you in a position to easily flip your hands through the ball. Fourth, keeping your right elbow locked to your side will give you a great point of reference. It keeps your swing plane correct, and is a great indicator of when to stop the back swing. Finally, it helps you to “stay connected” throughout the swing. If you have your right elbow locked at your side, it will be hard to swing your arms without rotating your shoulders and visa versa.

Austin Lodge Golf Club