Auchterarder Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Auchterarder Golf Club

About Auchterarder Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Auchterarder Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Auchterarder Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Auchterarder Golf Club

Auchterarder Golf Club is located in the heart of Perthshire, Scotland and welcomes visitors all year round. Our parkland course has spectacular views towards Glendevon and runs along side the PGA Centenary Course at Gleneagles. An easy walking course of 5775 yards it has a variety of holes with 6 challenging par 3s. Our comfortably refurbished clubhouse offers bar snacks and a full menu and is popular with visiting golf parties throughout the year.

Auchterarder Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

When we talk about the “ball-hole” line for any putt we mean the straight line between where the ball sits (before you putt it) and the hole (Figure 4.1.2). How ever because the hole is always your ultimate target some golfers call this their

“target line.” But many golfers use “target line” to describe the line between their ball and the point at which they are aiming the line on which they hope to start the putt rolling. But you seldom try both to aim and start your ball rolling along a straight line at the hole and expect it to keep rolling on that line because most putts break at least a little bit.

Therefore it is clearer to refer to this direction as your hall-hole line. Also realize that the ball-hole line extends forever in both directions (as shown) and that it is the ball-hole line that most golfers walk to and stand on behind their ball as they first try to read the break of their putts.

Standing behind the ball trying to read the green most golfers decide how much they think the putt is going to break and then where they are going to aim. They select a point or a direction where they intend to start their putt and we refer to the line from the ball to that point or direction as the “Aimline ” or desired initial starting line of the putt (Figure 4.1.3). It’s best called the Aimline because it is the line along which you align your body feet and (it’s hoped) your stroke because you want to start the ball rolling along that line. It ‘s where you’re aiming. If everything was figured properly the ball starts on your Aimline and will roll the proper speed and break (because of the slope of the green) gently into the cup.

The entire path that your putt takes is the “ball track” (left side of Figure 4.1.4). It may remind you of the “action track” sometimes used on television to show how a ball has traveled. The distances between the balls on the track indicate how fast (relatively) the putt is traveling: Farther apart means it is rolling faster; closer together and it is rolling slower. A detailed ball track provides an accurate understanding of a putt’s entire motion – both where and how fast it was going – better even than the same putt recorded and played back on videotape.

The amount or size of the “break” played on a putt is a measure of the difference between the direction you aim and start the putt rolling and where you want it to go. We define the amount of break as the distance between the Aimline (up by the hole) and the nearest edge of the hole measured along a line between the two (right side of Figure 4.1.4). The actual amount the ball breaks (curves) is something different because the ball track ideally curves into the center of the hole. But golfers refuse to deal with that detail. When golfers say they are playing one inch of break what they mean is that their Aimline passes one inch outside the edge of the hole as shown in Figure 4.1.5. Technically they expect the putt to break 3¼ inches – one inch plus half the diameter of the hole (2½ inches) – but they insist on thinking and saying that they are playing one inch of break.

Auchterarder Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Don ‘t Fight Your Flow-Lines

The easiest way to putt is with the “flow-lines” of your body aligned parallel-left of your Aimline (any line which is parallel to your Aimline and to the left of it is defined as “parallel-left of the Aimline). You’re probably not familiar with the term “flow-lines ” so look at Figure 4.10.7. The lines of flow through my shoulders forearms hips knees and feet are all parallel and to the left of my Aimline which is shown by the shaded white line on the green.

As I mentioned earlier (section 4.7) your putter will tend to swing naturally down the Aimline through impact if your shoulders are aligned parallel to that direction unless you do something to prevent this move with the muscles of your hands and wrists. So it’s very important to start your setup with the flow-line of your shoulders parallel to your Aimline.

To emphasize the power of this concept my “bad-flow-line” setup is shown in Figure 4.10.8. Look at my shoulder flow-line. From this position do you expect my putter to naturally swing (flow) down the Aimline? No way! It doesn’t do it when Perfy sets up and swings this way and it won’t swing down my Aimline either unless 1 compensate and use my muscles to make it do so.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 99

Once your shoulders are in place your attention should turn to the flow-line through your forearms as they are next most important in determining how your putter will swing through the impact zone. While all of this may sound very simple and in truth it can be for some golfers it does not turn out that way. A sure sign of trouble is the golfer who carries his right (trailing) forearm above and outside the perfect forearm plane as shown in Figure 4.10.9. This is the forearm power position from which it is difficult for the right forearm to not move over and in front of the left forearm through impact. I can assure you that most golfers who putt from this forearm position miss putts to the left when they get excited anxious or scared.

Forearm rotation is probably the most frequent killer of putting strokes I see in my schools. The forearm-power position is easy to get into because it feels natural. Well it is natural but it’s still wrong and it is something you have to resist.

Auchterarder Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Auchterarder Golf Club

This is a different view of the complete follow through. Your forearms are crossed, and that is the sign that you have completed the follow-through correctly Keep your head perfectly still during the entire swing This is the last crucial step that you must master. It’s by far the easiest step, but ironically it will produce the most results. The biggest problem is that you don’t always know when you are moving your head. You may find that swinging easier helps keep the head still, but other than that it is just something that you will have to really concentrate on.

Auchterarder Golf Club