Aston Wood Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Aston Wood Golf Club

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Golf Lessons at Aston Wood Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Aston Wood Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Aston Wood Golf Club

Our 18-hole championship golf course, designed by Peter Allis and Clive Clarke, has been constructed to USPGA standard. It presents a good test of golf to all players. Well placed bunkers, water features, recently planted semi- mature copses added to our fine undulating greens, makes Aston Wood an ideal venue for the mixed abilities of the modern day golfer.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Just like the “Killer-Downhiller” situation discussed above being aware of the problem should help you concentrate on doing the right things to avoid it. Anything that distracts you from focusing on and starting your putts along your Aimline at the proper speed will degrade your putting and must he avoided. So remember orient your stroke to your Aimline during indoor drills and keep your focus during your ritual on the Elevated Aimline during outdoor practice. Once you form a habit of starting all putts on your Aimline “facing-putts” will no longer be a problem for you.

14.9 Yipping the Short Putts

Short putts always have been and always will be missed on occasion. When the ball is within six feet of the hole it’s probably sitting in a footprint. And because it’s so close you know it has to be rolled slowly to the hole. Then there’s the lumpy donut to roll through. This combination of difficulties is why so many short putts are missed.

And not just by amateurs. Fine professionals like Doug Sanders (1970 British Open) Scott Hoch (1989 Masters) and Ed Sneed (1979 Masters) have missed very short putts that cost them the chance to win a major championship (Figure 14.9.1).

Misses happen. Blowing a short putt does not mean you have a problem with short putts. More important it does not mean that you have the “yips.”

However if you consistently miss short putts because you flinch or yip during your stroke you have a problem. And if you know you’re going to miss even be fore you putt then you do indeed have the yips.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Once you know how much gas you need then you have to figure out how hard to step on the gas pedal and when to step on the brakes as you drive on your Thanksgiving trip (something you figure out after you are into the trip) to negotiate the stops and turns in the road along the way. This “knowing how to drive” is analogous to knowing how to feel the proper stroke in putting where you must know in your mind’s eye the required size of the swing (or hardness of the hit) as well as how it will look and feel to impart the power which will provide the proper energy and speed of roll required. So touch is knowing how long the trip is and how much power it will require and feel is knowing how to apply the power (how to drive) to get you there.

Of course good touch and feel also require a proper read of the green knowing what will happen to your putt as it rolls. Think of green-reading as having a good road map for your journey. A good map or good directions can make the trip easy but a bad map with poor directions can turn the simplest trip into a nightmare.

So you need a map enough gas and the knowledge of how hard to step on the gas pedal along the way. You need all these things in concert to have a good trip. And you need good feel touch and green-reading skills also working together to putt well. Leave one out or do one poorly and it will he the same as losing your way on your Thanksgiving trip. Feel touch and green-reading are separate skills essentially different in nature yet each needs to be developed to provide the best result. And in case I ‘ve confused you that result is to roll the ball into the hole.

5.2 Touch and Feel Are in the Mind’s Eye

The skill bases for your touch and feel (green-reading will be discussed in Chapter 7) are intermingled in your mind. They are also intermingled in that they have a combined effect on putting results. But each is a separate skill which can be learned and developed over time.

Touch is in your head but it begins with knowing what your putt looks like and remembering (knowing based on past experience) how much power (the size or intensity of stroke) was required in the past for similar putts. Touch is an acquired skill based on past experiences. It resides in your memory bank and plays a part in creating the mind’s-eye picture of the size of stroke you need.

Before you can develop a good feel for a putt you need to have a good idea for how long it is and how much power will be required to roll it the proper speed and distance: In other words you need to have touch. Given that feel for the putt involves having a good idea of how to apply the power which will be needed to roll the ball at the optimum speed along that line to allow it to break into the hole. Having good feel for a putt is having the idea or picture in your mind’s eye of how the stroke will look and feel in both rhythm and intensity as it rolls the ball to the hole. So a part of feel is in your head. Feel also involves a kinesthetic awareness for the violence (or nonviolence) of your swing and knowing the physical sensation to expect at impact including the vibrations that will travel up the shaft after the putter strikes the ball. It is based on the feel of your collected experience from thousands of swings you’ve made on previous putts and the results they produced. This feel is produced in your nerve endings fingers arms and shoulders in the muscles of all of these entities as well as in your brain and memory.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Aston Wood Golf Club

Start your backswing. Focus on keeping your back straight, and your chest out. To help you swing directly around your spine, try focusing on rotating your right shoulder back and around your spine. If you focus on the right shoulder, your left shoulder will be in the correct position automatically. Simple. Keep your left elbow locked.

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