Ashley Wood Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Ashley Wood Golf Club

About Ashley Wood Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Ashley Wood Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Ashley Wood Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Ashley Wood Golf Club

Constructed on downland, the fairways are undulating and although hole 3 does have a short sharp hill, all others are easy walking. Four holes are played within Ashley Woods, ancient woodland carpeted with bluebells in May. Being natural chalk downland, the course drains very quickly and remains playable in all but the most extreme weather. The course is rarely closed for long, and trolleys have only been banned for four days during the last ten years.The par 70 course is 6270 yards long with some ‘open’ drives and some requiring more accuracy. It is a good test of golf for all levels of ability.

Ashley Wood Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Optical illusions do exist and on occasion putts appear to be longer or shorter than they are. These “tricks” are caused by the way light bounces off the grass the shape of a green or hillside a green’s surroundings even the position of someone else’s ball on the putting surface.

Learn a Metric

You need to learn to recognize your putt distances accurately and more important how to incorporate that knowledge into your touch before stroking a putt. It doesn’t matter if you learn to recognize your putt distances in feet steps yards or aardvarks (which are generally about four feet long). Any measuring system (what scientists call a “metric”) that lets you accurately judge and differentiate lengths consistently from one putt to another from practice green to golf course and from one year to the next will do.

I use a system that seems easy to me and obviously to others as it is very common. I measure putt-lengths in feet based on how many of my normal walking steps it takes to get from my ball to the hole. I played football years ago where I learned with the help of the 10-yard marks on the field how to take 10 steps in exactly 10 yards (30 feet). So “one step = three feet” has been my distance reference ever since. To measure my putt length I walk between ball and hole count

Develop Your Artistic Senses (Feel Touch Green-Reading) 305 my steps multiply by three and subtract or add whatever inches or feet remain at the end.

If you don’t already walk this way it’s simple to learn. Measure your putter and learn where 36 inches falls (plus or minus) relative to its length. Find a level part of a practice green and mark off 10 yards with balls using as a reference the 36 inches on your putter. Finally measure how it feels to take three-foot steps by walking back and forth along your yard markers (Figure 13.2.2). forth until you learn to make 3-foot steps.

Ashley Wood Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

In Figure 4.6.8 Fuzzy Zoeller simulates pendulum C by holding his hands inside of his shoulders and at an angle to his suspension point. This putter clearly rotates from outside the Aimline going back to outside the Aimline on the follow-through (the opposite of the screen-door rotation of pendulum B). Again this is a natural pendulum motion but it requires a small force (C) to keep his hands and his I5-degree angle to the vertical below the suspension point.

In these two examples of pendulums B and C it is clear that small side forces are required to make these strokes acceptable for putting and both strokes involve curved paths rotating around the golfer’s body. Now look at pendulum A as a putting stroke which involves no side force or curving path.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 77

The Simplest Pendulum

To examine the putting stroke of vertical pendulum A look at Figure 4.6.9 where the golfer’s hands hang vertically below his shoulders. On the left of this photo the attached putter hangs vertically below the hands which looks a bit strange. But stay with me. If the golfer now swings his arms straight hack along the line of this intended putt lets them relax and then swings them through – guided simply by the force of gravity – the putterface would swing perfectly along the line of this putt (Figure 4.6.9A’). This path is purely in-line along the Aimline just like pendulum A with no side forces or path curvature.

By starting with the putterface square to the line and using this pure-in-line stroke the ball would have to start rolling on that line. The pendulum swings this way because gravity is the only force acting on the stroke: There are no rotating forces to turn the putterface away from the target line and no side forces to push the putter off the straight Aimline path.

Now imagine a minor modification to this putter a lightweight but much longer face (Figure 4.6.9A`’). With this change the putter would still swing perfectly in-line beneath the shoulders and there still is nothing to cause rotation or circular motion in the stroke. In Figure 4.6.9A’ we’ve added a lightweight but rigid connection from the grip to the putterface near its toe. Assuming this connection is truly lightweight and doesn’t change the putter’s balance the swing path still would not change still would not rotate and would naturally continue to swing in-line along the straight line path beneath the shoulders.

Ashley Wood Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Ashley Wood Golf Club

The chest and shoulders shouldn’t be turning, unless your arms are turning with them. In other words, you want to start your swing with a shoulder turn, but your arms should start swinging at EXACTLY the same time. They are an extension. They are connected. Furthermore, your arms shouldn’t be swinging unless your chest is rotating. Don’t start swinging your arms without starting the shoulder turn. They are connected. Your left elbow remains locked throughout the entire swing. When you complete your shoulder turn, your arms should stop as well. The goal will be to have your left arm exactly parallel to the ground. Your elbow is still locked. When it gets there…STOP. Do not continue to swing your arms.

Ashley Wood Golf Club