Andover Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Andover Golf Club

About Andover Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Andover Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Andover Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Andover Golf Club

Established in 1907, the ‘Andover Golf Club’ is a 9-hole downland course situated in Winchester Road just half a mile south of Andover town centre. The course is 6096 yards long with splendid views of the undulating Hampshire countryside.Our signature hole is the par 3 ninth; 225 yards long with the tee situated on top of the hill, and the green 100 feet below.The chalk base allows the course to be free draining, and it is rarely closed even in the most adverse weather conditions. Golf trolleys can be used throughout the year.

Andover Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Problems on the Greens 15 some you can’t. That does not mean that all putting is the result of luck or that good putting is just lucky putting. There is no such thing as overall or long-term luck in putting. The good and bad breaks that occur to an individual always balance out over a golf season so in the end the players who make the most good strokes always hole the most putts. There is no net luck good or bad in putting.

So forget about luck both good and bad (which you can’t control anyway) and look for the factors that you can control (or at least influence) to determine results. Also become aware of the influences outside your control that can affect your results. Many of them are visible and therefore easily recognized. Some however are invisible to the human eye and are much more difficult to deal with (see section 2.3).

I don’t mention these outside-influence factors to make the game seem more difficult but to help you recognize and understand them so that when you witness unexpected behavior on the greens you won’t panic. And I mention them now before getting into any mechanics of good putting so you keep things in perspective keeping what you can and can’t control separate. If you can always keep the “big picture” in mind and ignore the short-term statistical uncertainties you can better accomplish your tasks of playing the game and focusing your attention on those things you can control.

We can see – and therefore know about – the obvious imperfections on the surface of a putting green caused by disease spike marks and pitch marks. These often cause balls to go somewhere other than where we wanted them to go:

All of these green imperfections can have a negative effect on putting especially when the ball is moving slowly (as it does near the end of its roll). And you know what? There is nothing you can do about it. But all of these are seeable so golfers understand them and know they are part of the game. If you miss a putt because of one of them you mark it down to a bit of bad luck assume that your good luck will come and don’t worry. But most important you don’t change your stroke because of them.

What about some factors that golfers don’t see? There are many. The length of the grass on a green (determined by the mower that cut it that morning) has a tremendous effect on how fast balls roll and how much putts break that day. The moisture in the surface of the green influences green speed: A light covering of dew water from a recent rain or the irrigation system even the sand content near the surface of the green (which affects water retention) all can change a putt’s roll speed and break. Each of these factors can be measured and known by golfers (in fact I’ll discuss them in Chapter 7) but they rarely are.

Andover Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 65

Data taken in my Scoring Game Schools show conclusively that reaction aiming is a learned skill that most golfers develop as a way to compensate for their putting stroke deficiencies. Players who block their strokes to the right of their Aimline learn to aim to the left of the Aimline. Players who pull their putts to the left learn to aim to the right.

Think about it: Have you ever seen golfers who block putts to the right also aim too far to the right? Of course not. They would miss putts so far to the right it would be ridiculous. They learn to aim to the left and they think this is proper because it produces better results. So the overriding influence on how golfers learn to aim is as a reaction to their results. That is reaction aiming.

Position Aiming

Less important to the golfer’s overall aim than reaction aiming position aiming is a golfer’s tendency to modify his or her reaction aim based on the position of the eyes relative to the Aimline . There are valid reasons for this phenomenon.

Aimline then he is sure to misalign his putter (and likely miss the putt) because now his view has changed to alignment angle B. The mind can ‘t keep everything properly aimed if it has to deal with constantly changing views of alignment.

Any golfer whose eyes are not consistently vertically above his Aimline will have to change his view of alignment due to the changing angles he sees for putts of different lengths. The result is inconsistent alignment. The only way to align the putterface properly time after time is by positioning both eyes exactly vertically above the Aimline so the alignment angle is always zero degrees for all putts re gardless of length (Figure 4.4.3 C and D).

Andover Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Andover Golf Club

Notice that the left elbow is still locked at this point. The elbow is just crossing the imaginary line that you have created between your eyes and your belly button. Remember, try to stop your elbow at this point. This is the point where your wrists will start to flip through the ball.Also notice the angle between the left arm and the club shaft is almost the same as it was at setup.

Andover Golf Club