Alnwick Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Alnwick Golf Club

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Golf Lessons at Alnwick Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Alnwick Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Alnwick Golf Club

Here at Alnwick Golf Club we are celebrating our Centenary year – why not pay us a visit and enjoy the atmosphere of one of Northumberland’s friendliest golf club’s, as well as testing your golfing skills on our challenging course. The course is located within minutes of the main A1 above Alnwick Town Centre, we are 30 miles south of Berwick-upon-Tweed and 32 miles north of Newcastle upon Tyne

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Drill 1: Closed-Eyes Drill The purpose of this drill is to learn the feel of the three-foot-putt stroke which supplies optimum power to roll putts consistently through the lumpy donut without producing lip-outs. Drop three balls three feet from the hole and putt them in. Then move 90 degrees around the hole and do it

If again and again and again until you’ve circled the hole and made 12 in a row. you miss any putt start over until you hole all 12 consecutively.

Next choose one of the four positions you putted from before and starting there roll three putts in from three feet but this time with your eyes closed. If you miss one with your eyes closed putt three more with your eyes open to reestablish your feel then repeat three with your eyes closed again. If you miss one again repeat the cycle of six putts until you make them all. (A note for when you miss: It’s always good to notice if your misses roll 17 inches past the back edge of the cup to ensure you are rolling your putts at or at least near the optimum putting speed.)

Drill 2: Getting-Longer Drill To start place four balls three feet from a hole one at each of the 3:00 6:00 9:00 and 12:00 o ‘clock positions and putt them in. Every time you make all four putts move a foot farther away and putt them all again. Each time you putt this drill try to improve on your previous record for how far away from the hole you can get without missing. Always begin at three feel and move progressively outward and always use your rhythm routine and ritual on each putt. As always notice how far past the hole your misses roll. By doing so the Getting-Longer Drill will quickly teach you that dying putts to the hole is as had as jamming them too hard and causing lip-outs. Again the goal is to groove a feel for the optimum speed for holing putts.

Drill 3: Pure-Push Drill A pure-push putting stroke is not legal (it doesn’t conform to USGA rules because it has no backswing) but it is a good way to practice. My friend Peter Jacobsen showed this to me and it helped take his short-putting to the next level. The Pure-Push Drill is designed to help you learn the feel of keeping your putterface square to the Aimline on your follow-through. The drill is the same as the Closed-Eyes Drill above except you don’t make a backswing in your stroke; just push the ball toward the hole (Figure 13.3.9) directly from the address position of your putter. Make 12 push-putts in a row with your eyes open then push in three in a row with your eyes closed. After doing this drill a few times you will begin to notice the similarity in feel between your finishes in the Pure-Push Drill and your other short-putt drills with your putterface staying square to your Aimline.

322 Develop Your Artistic Senses (Feel Touch Green-Reading)

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The velocity with which a ball moves along the green can be referred to in several ways. Some golfers refer to this as the rolling speed or speed of the putt. Some golfers talk about the pace of a putt while others talk about how fast a putt is moving. It would be nice if we all could mean and understand the same thing when referring to speed.

Technically the speed of a putt can be described and measured in quantitative terms as the velocity of motion (in units of inches or feet per second) in a given direction and the decay or decrease of velocity (the velocity profile) as the ball rolls to a stop. However since most golfers don’t think in technical terms on or off the course the actual velocity of a putt at any instant is neither very meaningful nor useful. As a result golfers talk about the speed of their putts as being too fast too slow or just about right as they approach the hole.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 61

But if you want to learn more about controlling your putting speed and making more putts you need to know more about speed than that. In fact you need to know how the rolling speed of your putts compares to their perfect or optimum speed around the hole. The speed of a putt depends on its length how fast it started where it is along its ball track how fast the green surface is and the slope (up down or sidehill) it is rolling on. For every putt there is an optimum speed that will optimize the percentage of putts that would both hit and stay in the hole. Therefore in this book as in my Scoring Game Schools we refer to a putt’s speed (while imagining its ball track) as how it relates to the optimum speed it should or could be rolling. For example as you can see in Figure 4.3.1 the left putt’s speed was too much as compared to the right putt’s speed which was virtually perfect. A detailed discussion of putting speed and optimum-speed ball tracks is in Chapter 7.

Green Speed

The speed of the surface of the green or green speed affects a ball’s roll in speed direction and amount of break. I ‘m sure you have heard greens referred to as “fast ” “slow ” “quick ” “slick ” or “sticky.” Technically the speed of the green is determined by the frictional characteristics of the surface of the green which is controlled primarily by the length type density and moisture content of the grass (more on this in Chapter 7). Golf course superintendents traditionally measure the speed characteristics of greens using a device called the Stimpmeter. much speed (left) and perfect speed (right) for two putts rolled on the same starting line.

The Stimpmeter developed years ago by a man named Edward Stimpson is a crude yet simple way to measure how far a ball will roll on a flat portion of a green when it is given a standard starting speed. The USGA-approved version of a

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Alnwick Golf Club

Keep focusing on bringing your right shoulder back and around your spine. Some of you may be able to turn about 90 degrees around your spine as shown in the picture on the left. Others may only be able to turn 45 degrees around your spine. Either is okay, but do not start moving other parts of the body to compensate for not being able to make a full shoulder turn. Stop when it gets uncomfortable. The important part is to STAY CONNECTED. When your left arm becomes parallel to the ground, stop your swing.

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