Aldeburgh Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Aldeburgh Golf Club

About Aldeburgh Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Aldeburgh Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Aldeburgh Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Aldeburgh Golf Club

The challenging18-hole course is maintained and presented in fine condition, with the added bonus of superb views across the River Alde to Iken Church on the southern bank and, across from it, a line of pine trees silhouetted against the water, known locally as ‘Little Japan’. It is breathtaking at any time of day, but particularly so as the sun begins to set in the wide skies of East Anglia behind the church. In the other direction, coastal shipping can be spied from the higher spots on the first nine. Given the chance to play a splendid course in these surroundings, who can afford to miss it? Certainly not the player who also knows that the back nine has its own version of ‘Amen Corner’ and brings the successful golfer home glowing with satisfaction.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Once you’ve found the proper sweetspot mark it along the top line of your putter with a permanent-ink marker then tap-tap again to confirm your findings. When you are confident of the location mark it permanently by filing in a small groove (a punch mark also will do) which you can fill with paint. This will give you a permanent identification of where to address and hit your putts.

If your putter already has a mark but you find it’s in the wrong place you can still indicate the proper sweetspot in a visually pleasing way. Again tap-tap until you find the true sweetspot and mark it with a washable-ink pen. (Be sure to tap-tap one last time to verify that you have it marked right.) Measure the distance from the true sweetspot to the manufacturer’s mark then make a second mark the same distance from the sweetspot but in the other direction. Once you file a groove or other permanent mark on this new spot on the putter’s top line you’ll have two marks with the sweetspot centered precisely between them.

Test Your Pattern First

Before you start practicing to improve the solidity of your ball contact measure and document your skill (or lack thereof) in this area. Not only is this informative but it will help you to see improvement and motivate you to keep working and improving later on.

Start your test by attaching a piece of Teacher Putting Tape on your putterface being careful to position the center of the tape over the sweetspot (Figure 12.3.2). Also be sure to keep the bottom edge of the tape parallel to and just above the bottom edge of the putterface (so it won’t drag on the green). “Take 3 balls and hit 10 putts from each of three different distances – 3 feet 10 feet and 30 feet (30 putts total). At each distance putt from several different directions so this is a balanced test of uphill right-to-left left-to-right and downhill putts.

I mprove Your Stroke Mechanics 281

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

As you will see in section 4.8 putterface angle has more effect on the line a pull starts on than does the putter path. But golfers practice putter path because

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 73 it’s easier for them to see their friends (from whom they take advice) can see it and they don’t know what else to practice. I guess it’s not too hard to understand why their putting doesn’t improve.

The Screen Door

For many years Harvey Penick one the game’s greatest teachers taught that the putter should swing open on the backswing and swing closed on the follow-through like a screen door as it moved around a player ‘s body (Figure 4.6.3). He believed that the natural stroke path should move to the inside on the backswing (around a motionless body) and back to the inside on the follow-through. He taught many golfers to become great players including my good friends Tom Kite and Ben Crenshaw and his screen-door concept has been the generally accepted way to putt throughout most of the 50 years I’ve been playing this game.

It was how I wanted to putt back when I thought I had a chance to have a playing career. However despite my tremendous admiration for Mr. Penick and his teaching accomplishments (which are legendary) and my own efforts to copy his opening and closing “screen-door” method my more recent research has proven that while this stroke can be effective the screen door is neither the best nor the simplest way to swing a putter.

Three Pendulums

In my first book on putting Putt Like the Pros which was published about 10 years ago I pointed out that a pure-in-line stroke path along the Aimline was the easiest most natural and best putter path to use (Figure 4.6.4). However it turns out that many golfers including some golf professionals never read or understood the concepts that determined this to be a natural motion and continue to believe and teach that the putter should swing around the body in the screen-door semicircular motion as shown in Figure 4.6.5. To understand why the in-line stroke motion is the simplest way to putt you must first understand the mechanics of the way pendulums swing. Three pendu

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Aldeburgh Golf Club

Notice that the right elbow becomes locked now as the right arm continues to swing. As you can see the right wrist has started to roll on top of the left wrist. The left elbow is now closer to the body, and is able to bend. The left elbow cannot be completely stopped at the imaginary line, but just a hesitation is enough to let your hands swing through the ball. Notice that the triangle is still present.

Aldeburgh Golf Club