Abersoch Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Abersoch Golf Club

About Abersoch Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Abersoch Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Abersoch Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

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The original 9 holes (now holes 4 to 12) designed by Harry Vardon have been extended to an 18 hole course including 5 parkland holes. Off the white tees the course extends over a challenging 5847 yds (par 69), 5622 (par 69) off the yellows and a 5268 (par 71) off the red, ladies tees.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Once you’ve found the proper sweetspot mark it along the top line of your putter with a permanent-ink marker then tap-tap again to confirm your findings. When you are confident of the location mark it permanently by filing in a small groove (a punch mark also will do) which you can fill with paint. This will give you a permanent identification of where to address and hit your putts.

If your putter already has a mark but you find it’s in the wrong place you can still indicate the proper sweetspot in a visually pleasing way. Again tap-tap until you find the true sweetspot and mark it with a washable-ink pen. (Be sure to tap-tap one last time to verify that you have it marked right.) Measure the distance from the true sweetspot to the manufacturer’s mark then make a second mark the same distance from the sweetspot but in the other direction. Once you file a groove or other permanent mark on this new spot on the putter’s top line you’ll have two marks with the sweetspot centered precisely between them.

Test Your Pattern First

Before you start practicing to improve the solidity of your ball contact measure and document your skill (or lack thereof) in this area. Not only is this informative but it will help you to see improvement and motivate you to keep working and improving later on.

Start your test by attaching a piece of Teacher Putting Tape on your putterface being careful to position the center of the tape over the sweetspot (Figure 12.3.2). Also be sure to keep the bottom edge of the tape parallel to and just above the bottom edge of the putterface (so it won’t drag on the green). “Take 3 balls and hit 10 putts from each of three different distances – 3 feet 10 feet and 30 feet (30 putts total). At each distance putt from several different directions so this is a balanced test of uphill right-to-left left-to-right and downhill putts.

I mprove Your Stroke Mechanics 281

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

In my first book on putting Putt Like the Pros which was published about 10 years ago I pointed out that a pure-in-line stroke path along the Aimline was the easiest most natural and best putter path to use (Figure 4.6.4). However it turns out that many golfers including some golf professionals never read or understood the concepts that determined this to be a natural motion and continue to believe and teach that the putter should swing around the body in the screen-door semicircular motion as shown in Figure 4.6.5. To understand why the in-line stroke motion is the simplest way to putt you must first understand the mechanics of the way pendulums swing. Three pendu

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 75 lums are illustrated in Figure 4.6.6. Each is swinging from a fixed point with pendulum A swinging vertically below its suspension point describing a back-andforth in-line path along a straight line. Pendulum B is swinging at a 20-degree angle to the vertical supported by a small force shown by arrow B and describing a curved path around the spot directly below its suspension point. Pendulum C is swinging at the opposite 20-degree angle supported by arrow C in a curved motion in the opposite direction around the spot below its suspension point.

All three pendulums are describing pure pendulum motions (the pendulum rhythm will be discussed in section 6.3) which occur in a gravitational field such as that found on Earth. But only pendulum A swings with gravity helping to determine its straight in-line path without any rotation or curvature of the swing path. As you can see both pendulums B and C require outside forces to keep them moving in circular motions.

Now relate these pendulums to putting strokes by attaching putters to the bottom of each pendulum. Pendulum B is what Harvey Penick prescribed: The golfer’s hands hang outside of his shoulder line (the suspension point) at some angle supported by the force B (shown by Justin Leonard in Figure 4.6.7). This puller will describe a curved path around the body like a screen door as long as no hand or arm muscles prevent it from doing so.

In Figure 4.6.8 Fuzzy Zoeller simulates pendulum C by holding his hands inside of his shoulders and at an angle to his suspension point. This putter clearly rotates from outside the Aimline going back to outside the Aimline on the follow-through (the opposite of the screen-door rotation of pendulum B). Again this is a natural pendulum motion but it requires a small force (C) to keep his hands and his I5-degree angle to the vertical below the suspension point.

In these two examples of pendulums B and C it is clear that small side forces are required to make these strokes acceptable for putting and both strokes involve curved paths rotating around the golfer’s body. Now look at pendulum A as a putting stroke which involves no side force or curving path.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 77

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Abersoch Golf Club

Focus on using your spine as your axis now. Turn both shoulders and sides directly around your spine. Keep your left arm locked, and your left wrist locked. Although difficult to see from this camera-angle, the triangle is still perfectly in tact.

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